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Upcoming Courses | Catalog and Rotation | Archive

Fall Semester 2015

The following descriptions of individual courses and sections supplement the general catalog descriptions. For the complete registration listings with CRNs and prerequisites, see the official schedule.

ENG 100ENG 200ENG 270-273ENG 300ENG 400Graduate  

Composition I and Honors Program

  • ENGLISH 100: Composition I
  • ENGLISH 100A: Honors Program. Contact the Honors Office at 956-8391 for information.
  • ENGLISH 190: Composition I for Transfer Students to UH Manoa

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ENG 100(1): Composition I

instructor:  Michael PakMore
time:  MWF 7:30-8:20
crn:  71086
focus:  FW, FW
description: 
COURSE DESCRIPTION
English 100 is an introduction to composition. We will be studying different modes of writing, which include life writing, professional writing, and argumentative writing.

REQUIREMENTS
-Attendance, participation, and short writing responses
-Five papers, meta-commentaries, and peer reviews
-Keeping current through email and Laulima

READINGS

Class readings will be all digital, available online and through Laulima. It is your responsibility to bring these to class, either printed out or as an electronic format.

PAPERS

There are five papers in this class, each between 3-5 pages long. All papers will be accompanied by a short meta-commentary. Working with peers is an important literacy and our classroom will be very collaborative. Since we will be peer reviewing papers in class, you need to bring three printed hardcopies of your paper when the draft is due (one for me, two for your peers).

GRADING POLICY
Your grade will be 80% from your papers (including the drafts, meta-commentaries, and peer reviews), and 20% from attendance and class participation. I use pluses/minuses in my grading and follow UH Manoa's policies on plagiarism. Deliberate cheating could result in your failing the course plus your being subject to further university disciplinary action.

For more information on this course, contact the instructor at pakm@hawaii.edu

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ENG 100(2): Composition I

instructor:  Chris KelseyMore
time:  MWF 7:30-8:20
crn:  76224
focus:  FW
description: 

ENG 100 Composition I

MWF, Section 002, 7:30-8:20  Dr. Christopher Kelsey

The Three R’s: Reading, Reasoning, and ‘Riting

The course’s general aims are twofold: to strengthen students’ writing and to have them produce it at a functional level consistent with the university’s expectations.  Core course elements are:

            *an engaged reception of selected works

            *an awareness of the varieties of English, their uses and significance

            *an ability to produce writing appropriate to an academic context and                                                   readership.

This class will emphasize analytical/argumentative writing along with personal/experiential writing.  There will be several required conferences. Students will freewrite at the end of class on a regular basis. A daily reading schedule will be affected through a discussion-based pedagogy, small-group and class-wide.

Course Requirements

 

·      Attendance and participation

·      Six short essays

·      Three medium-length essays

·      A final portfolio

Required Texts

 

·      Course Reader (available from Professional Image, 2633 S. King Street)

·      A thin writing tablet

 

 

 

The writing asignments will consist of six short essays and three mid-range essays.  In addition, a selection of these papers will be revised and resubmitted in the form of a final portfolio.


ENG 100(3): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
crn:  75705
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(4): Composition I

instructor:  Julia WietingMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
crn:  73634
focus:  FW
description: 

Composition in more than just writing. It describes a set of important critical thinking skills, such as summarizing, evaluating, organizing, and arguing, which we communicate through writing and speaking. In this course we will identify the features of critical thinking that are important in college, and practice using them for a range of academic purposes. At the end of the course, you should be able to articulate not only how well you understand a given piece of writing, but also what you would need to do to understand it further.

This course will be organized in short units that a) identify specific critical thinking skills, b) enable students to learn those skills through investigation and problem solving, and c) move students to the point where they can express those skills by writing about important topics. In other words, we will focus on learning how to think, and practice putting our thoughts into words. There will be a significant reading component to this class, along with hands-on learning in class and tutorials on research and research methodologies. Finally, there will be a major emphasis on learning how to evaluate your own writing.

In addition to learning a set of critical thinking and critical writing skills which will apply broadly to your college experience, the second half of the semester will present you with significant opportunities to explore how writing is used in your field(s) of interest. Writing might not be easy, but it can be satisfying – if we learn how to make it useful.

Texts

Readings will be provided by the instructor as necessary. Students will need to purchase a dictionary, available at Revolution Books.

Assignments

- Homework: reading responses, skills practice, journalling

- In-class investigations that assess whether you've learned a particular skill(s)

- One personal essay

- One research essay

- Two self-assessments (midterm and end of term)

Attendance and participation are also required for this course. You should expect to work actively in class in small or large groups, and you should expect this course to be challenging. But fun - all hitchhikers are welcome.


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ENG 100(5): Composition I

instructor:  Lisa SheaMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
crn:  75706
focus:  FW
description: 

English 100 is an introduction to writing in the university, and we will be studying different modes of writing through the lens of community and place.

REQUIREMENTS

  • Be prepared for each class discussion by doing assigned reading/writing in advance.
  • Submit all assignments on time.
  • Contribute to class and group discussions, both in class and online.
  • Check the course website regularly to receive class announcements and updates.
  • Think critically. Be curious. 

READINGS

There is no required textbook for this class. Readings will be provided digitally, and it will be your responsibility to either print these or have a method of annotating them digitally. All readings must be brought to class on the day they will be discussed.

PAPERS

There will be four major papers, each between 3-6 pages long. All papers will be accompanied by a short meta-commentary reflection. Throughout the semester, each student will develop a portfolio, which will be submitted as a final project.

GRADING POLICY

Final grades will be 55% from major papers (including drafts, meta-commentary, and peer reviews). An additional 15% will be from the portfolio process. The remainder of the grade (30%) will be from attendance and short writing responses. This class adheres to UH Manoa's policies on plagiarism, and deliberate cheating could result in failing the course along with being subject to further university disciplinary action.

For more information on this course, please contact the instructor: lisashea@hawaii.edu.


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ENG 100(6): Composition I

instructor:  Janet GrahamMore
time:  MWF 9:30-10:20
crn:  75707
focus:  FW
description: 

How do you know what you know? How is academic knowledge created? Using such questions as the basis for formulating knowledge, we begin our work developing your ability to comprehend academic discourse, write academic arguments, and approach research as a form of personal and academic inquiry through written assignments, PowerPoint lectures, and student-led weekly reading discussions.

In this course, students will be introduced to the rhetorical, conceptual, and stylistic demands of writing at the college level and instructed in composing processes, search strategies, and composing from sources. This course also provides students with experiences in the library and on the Internet and enhances their skills in accessing and using various types of primary and secondary materials.

Course Requirements:

Class Participation and Preparation

You will write informally in class, analyze short texts for rhetorical, theoretical, and linguistic features, discuss what you read and write, listen to and show respect for everyone in our learning community, and use relevant feedback with the goal of improving all aspects of your written work.

Assessed Writing

You will write four formal pieces of polished prose including a literary response, a rhetorical analysis, an argumentative essay, and a research essay. As you gain proficiency in selecting sources and using and citing them appropriately, you will be expected to incorporate a greater number and variety of academic sources into your work. You may resubmit any of these papers within a reasonable time frame for a higher score provided the quality of the piece is sufficiently improved.

Required Texts

This is a Laulima based course. All texts can be accessed from Laulima.

 


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ENG 100(8): Composition I

instructor:  Donovan CollepsMore
time:  MWF 9:30-10:20
crn:  71088
focus:  FW
description: 

Aloha mai kākou. This course is an introduction to the kinds of college-level writing that will be asked of you throughout your college careers, no matter what field of study you’ve chosen or will chose for yourselves. The structure of this introduction to college writing, this course, will center on the place in which our learning and living take place—Hawaiʻi. We will read, write, and discuss a variety of issues that have occurred, and are occurring, within this place. A main goal for this course will be to build a constellation of varied perspectives about Hawai‘i and to contribute your own thoughts to these constellations via a number of argumentative writing strategies. 

Our first major writing assignment will focus on a place, or places, that have fed you—physically, intellectually, spiritually, and culturally. The knowledge each of us brings to the class has been shaped, in multiple ways, by these places.  We will continue into interview projects that engage with another person’s (one of your classmate's) place narratives for your second major writing assignment. The last major writing assignment will be a research paper that looks at a particular historical moment of Hawaiʻi that interests you. The final draft of this research paper will represent your use of a substantial number of rhetorical devices found in argumentative/scholarly writing that we will develop throughout the semester, as well as a creative component for the final assignment.

This class will be a place of active learning that is safe, supportive, and open minded. 

In addition to the above, this course will expose that good writing is a process. Writing can be, and is, messy. Together, we will explore this messiness in hopes of finding ways to navigate through them, successfully. Another main goal of our time together will be for each of us to develop our own writing process that disrupts the typical—and most often less successful—approach to writing against a deadline.

Required Texts:

There are no actual texts to purchase for this class. All readings will be made available to you via our class website and our Laulima class website. 

 

Course Goals / Student Learning Outcomes:

Students who pass this course should be able to:

   Compose college-level writing, including but not limited to, academic discourse, that achieves a specific purpose and responds adeptly to an identifiable audience.

   Provide evidence of effective strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading a text in order to produce finished prose.

    Compose an argument that makes use of source material that is relevant and credible and that is integrated in accordance with an appropriate style guide.


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ENG 100(9): Composition I

instructor:  Jamaica OsorioMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
crn:  74070
focus:  FW
description: 

Description

This is a place based English 100 course. Our course materials and conversations will be based and informed by the places we represent as individuals and the environment that surrounds us as students at the University of Hawaiʻi (Hawaiʻi). The ultimate goal of the course is to help students develop critical thinking, reasoning, and effective writing skills through the lens of understanding the relationship between writing/ academic discourse and place.

Required Texts

All required texts will be made available through Laulima.

Assignments

  Weekly assignments will include reading, and written responses.

Kuʻu One Hānau

  • Personal narrative discussing your One Hānau, or your homeland
He ali'i ka 'āina; he kauwa ke kanaka: Wahi Pana Project
  • Experiential / research based essay on a site in Hawaiʻi

Imi Naʻauao: Argumentative Paper

  • Annotated Bibliography
  • Source Based Argumentative Paper

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ENG 100(10): Composition I

instructor:  Amanda ChristieMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
crn:  74387
focus:  FW
description: 
Writing and Doing 

What do you like to write about? The answers to this question vary in detail but often boil down to what you like to do in everyday life. What we do and what we care enough to write about often directly relate to one another. In this class, the process of writing will be connected to tangible physical actions that take place inside and outside of the class. We will build things like robots and maps and diagrams as we talk about how a piece of writing is built and refined. We will walk through, observe, and take an active part in engaging with the communities around us as we connect what we do in everyday life with what we write. We will connect learning with doing and doing with writing in such a way, as to hopefully, make the words we put on the page this semester do something amazing!

 

Assignments:

There are 5 major writing assignments including a problem-solution essay, an annotated bibliography, an exploratory essay, a critical analysis paper, and a final research paper. You will also be required several short (often interactive) writing responses both inside and outside of class. All of the major assignments can be revised within this course. The aim of this course is to focus on the progression of writing and the final grade is based on that progression.

 

Course Texts & Supplies:

1). English 100 Course Reader

(available for purchase at Professional Image Printing)

2). Composition Notebook for journal assignments


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ENG 100(11): Composition I

instructor:  Brooks Britton
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
crn:  74388
focus:  FW
description: 
“The limits of my language mean the limits of my world” (Ludwig Wittgenstein).
“The greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something and tell what
it saw in a plain way […] To see clearly is poetry, prophecy and religion, all in one”
Description: The ability to inscribe thought into word and sentence remains one of
humanity’s greatest achievements. No matter the field of study or type of work, the
ability to condense our ideas onto a page that may be understood by someone else rests at
the heart of all we do. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the power of the
written word in a variety of forms, and how different types of writing function in distinct
ways. We will explore the writing process itself to help refine our own ability to write,
learning about various rhetorical strategies and generic conventions, research methods
and typed of discourse, and about the demands of genre and how we might employ all of
these in our own writing. Above all else this course will focus on the process of writing,
how every piece of good writing is developmental, and that revision is a writer’s main
occupation. It will help you discover your own writing process, and aid you in refining it.
At the end of this course you will have gained the tools needed to write clear and concise
academic prose that will help you not only in your time at University, but in whatever
career you choose afterwards.
Requirements: Weekly writing assignments with peer revision. Group-projects and
presentations. 3 short essays: Autobiographical/Narrative. Observational/Descriptive.
Analytic/Argumentative and one longer research essay
(John Ruskin).

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ENG 100(12): Composition I

instructor:  Karyl GarlandMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
crn:  79645
focus:  FW
description: 
Each student taking English 100 will strengthen in his or her ability to read and write with precision and clarity. You will be invited, through major and minor writing assignments, to consider your audience and uncover the most effective delivery for your message. Through research-based essay assignments, you will further your knowledge about how to find and use outside sources, beyond your own experience and knowledge, that are both reliable and scholarly and how to cite these sources using Modern Language Association (MLA) formatting. You will be asked to create time for writing that will be sufficient for composing written pieces that are clear and well revised. You will also be asked to reflect on the process you go through as you write and to learn about yourself and how you think through this reflection.

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ENG 100(13): Composition I

instructor:  Theo GarneauMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
crn:  74200
focus:  FW
description: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS

This course aims to be a comprehensive college-level composition course, offering students 

  • a varied and provocative reading and writing agenda; a thorough introduction to gr­ammatical, rhetorical, and stylistic basics of writing in a university community; 
  • a solid introduction to research using reliable sources from university libraries and the Internet; 
  • an opportunity to work regularly in groups with fellow students and in conference with the instructor; 
  • a forum to share reactions and explore issues in an open and supportive atmosphere.


This is not a theme” course. Rather than exploring in depth one subject throughout the semester (gender construction, folklore, or sustainability, for instance), this course will offer an eclectic and hopefully engaging mix of readings on politics, race, society, commerce, language, sports, sexuality, drugs, music, and so on. We will also mix and match genres, analyzing speeches, memoirs, short stories, encomia and invective, business memos, and essays galore: expository, analytical, argumentative, some written by professors, some written by students. Perhaps the only constant will be the high quality of the writing. Each piece we read will offer unique lessons in style and clarity, subtlety and depth, construction, correctness, and persuasiveness.

In addition to our regular in-class work of writing in various modes (freewriting, directed writing, collaborative writing, brainstorming, summarizing readings and individual class sessions, etc.), students will submit twenty pages of polished prose (five three-page papers in various rhetorical modes and one five-page research paper); they will workshop each others’ essays, give several group presentations, and take ten quizzes.

Regarding the three-page papers: I’m asking for five concise three-page essays (right to the bottom of page three, but not spilling onto page four). These are due at the beginning of the five classes specified below in the tentative schedule. There will be separate prompts for each essay, but all of your essays should incorporate the analyses of the readings that we will have done in class. I strongly suggest, therefore, that you take careful notes on our discussions. We will workshop these essays in order to refine our skills of attentive reading and listening, of giving and receiving feedback. You will turn in to me the improved draft in the next class session.


COURSE WORK

Final grades will be determined by the following criteria:

  • Five three-page papers—drafts and rewrites (30%)
  • One five-page documented research paper (20%)
  • In-class participation: discussion groups, draft response/peer review groups (15%). Students who are absent for their groups work will lose 3% for each absence.
  • Ten quizzes (25%). Quizzes are given at the beginning of the class; quizzes missed due to tardiness or unexcused absences cannot be made up. A grade of zero is given for missed quizzes.
  • Collected in-class writings (10%)


REQUIRED TEXTS

Class readings are available on-line and free at our UH Laulima page under Resources > Class Readings. You are not obliged to print these texts, but if our classroom does not have computer terminals for each student, please bring an electronic device that allows you to access the text.

The Brief Penguin Handbook With Exercises (Includes 2009 MLA Updates) is an absolutely required text (available at the campus bookstore and online). This more than 600-page handbook offers chapters on grammar, mechanics, punctuation, style, and writing effective phrases, clauses, sentences, and paragraphs. Some chapters explore the basics of rhetoric, structuring essays, writing drafts, rewriting, and editing; other chapters treat the art of research: finding and evaluating sources, using sources responsibly, integrating them correctly into your prose, etc. There are also chapters on writing about literature, on writing about business. And finally, the handbook gives examples of submitted papers in various professional styles of documentation: the MLA, the APA, and the CMS. (We will cover as much of this material as we can in our short semester, but I will regularly encourage you to keep this text throughout your college career so that you may refer to it whenever you have questions about punctuation, usage, grammar, organization, and so on.) We will begin using the handbook the second week of classes, so get one immediately.


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ENG 100(14): Composition I

instructor:  Jade Higa
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
crn:  74128
focus:  FW
description: 
ENG 100 is one of the most important classes you will take in college. Knowing how to read and
write well are life skills valued in every field: whether you’re putting together a lab report,
preparing a final paper, tweeting, texting, or just sending a short email, written words are usually
the first way you interact with people. This class will help you to better understand how to work
with words through reading assignments, small and large group discussions, in-class writing and
small homework assignments, research, and formal essays.
Requirements
1. Attendance and participation: you are required to be present both physically and mentally.
This means you show up to class with your work completed, you listen actively to the instructor
and your classmates, and you contribute regularly to discussion.
2. In-class work, homework, and quizzes: depending on the day, you may be asked to
demonstrate your knowledge of the required readings and in-class discussion through daily
assignments which may include (but is not limited to) group work, worksheets, blog posts,
quizzes, and free writing.
3. Presentation: there will be one 5-7 minute formal presentation during the semester.
4. Papers: you will have four formal essays between 2-10 pages (the length and difficulty of
these essays will increase throughout the semester). At least one of these papers will require you
to do research. In addition, you will be required to turn in early pieces of each paper (theses,
outlines, and rough drafts). Note: papers will be turned in online.
Texts
There are no required texts for this section of ENG 100. All readings can be accessed through
Laulima. If you would like to purchase a style guide, you may. Keep in mind, we will be using
only MLA format in our class. Suggested guide (can be purchased online): MLA Handbook for
Writers of Research Papers, 7th Edition.
Course Aims
1. Students will employ critical thinking in analysis of writing, in discussion, and in their own
essays.
2. Students will construct academic papers driven by clear theses and consisting of original ideas,
coherent arguments, clear language, and fully developed paragraphs.
3. Students will incorporate instructor and peer feedback as well as their own knowledge to
revise their own academic papers.
4. Students will learn to locate and appropriately integrate secondary materials into their
arguments.
5. Students will write with a focus on process rather than product.

ENG 100(15): Composition I

instructor:  Janet GrahamMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
crn:  71090
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(16): Composition I

instructor:  Theo GarneauMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
crn:  71087
focus:  FW
description: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS

This course aims to be a comprehensive college-level composition course, offering students 

  • a varied and provocative reading and writing agenda; a thorough introduction to gr­ammatical, rhetorical, and stylistic basics of writing in a university community; 
  • a solid introduction to research using reliable sources from university libraries and the Internet; 
  • an opportunity to work regularly in groups with fellow students and in conference with the instructor; 
  • a forum to share reactions and explore issues in an open and supportive atmosphere.


This is not a themecourse. Rather than exploring in depth one subject throughout the semester (gender construction, folklore, or sustainability, for instance), this course will offer an eclectic and hopefully engaging mix of readings on politics, race, society, commerce, language, sports, sexuality, drugs, music, and so on. We will also mix and match genres, analyzing speeches, memoirs, short stories, encomia and invective, business memos, and essays galore: expository, analytical, argumentative, some written by professors, some written by students. Perhaps the only constant will be the high quality of the writing. Each piece we read will offer unique lessons in style and clarity, subtlety and depth, construction, correctness, and persuasiveness.

In addition to our regular in-class work of writing in various modes (freewriting, directed writing, collaborative writing, brainstorming, summarizing readings and individual class sessions, etc.), students will submit twenty pages of polished prose (five three-page papers in various rhetorical modes and one five-page research paper); they will workshop each othersessays, give several group presentations, and take ten quizzes.

Regarding the three-page papers: I’m asking for five concise three-page essays (right to the bottom of page three, but not spilling onto page four). These are due at the beginning of the five classes specified below in the tentative schedule. There will be separate prompts for each essay, but all of your essays should incorporate the analyses of the readings that we will have done in class. I strongly suggest, therefore, that you take careful notes on our discussions. We will workshop these essays in order to refine our skills of attentive reading and listening, of giving and receiving feedback. You will turn in to me the improved draft in the next class session.


COURSE WORK

Final grades will be determined by the following criteria:

  • Five three-page papers—drafts and rewrites (30%)
  • One five-page documented research paper (20%)
  • In-class participation: discussion groups, draft response/peer review groups (15%). Students who are absent for their groups work will lose 3% for each absence.
  • Ten quizzes (25%). Quizzes are given at the beginning of the class; quizzes missed due to tardiness or unexcused absences cannot be made up. A grade of zero is given for missed quizzes.
  • Collected in-class writings (10%)


REQUIRED TEXTS

Class readings are available on-line and free at our UH Laulima page under Resources > Class Readings. You are not obliged to print these texts, but if our classroom does not have computer terminals for each student, please bring an electronic device that allows you to access the text.

The Brief Penguin Handbook With Exercises (Includes 2009 MLA Updates) is an absolutely required text (available at the campus bookstore and online). This more than 600-page handbook offers chapters on grammar, mechanics, punctuation, style, and writing effective phrases, clauses, sentences, and paragraphs. Some chapters explore the basics of rhetoric, structuring essays, writing drafts, rewriting, and editing; other chapters treat the art of research: finding and evaluating sources, using sources responsibly, integrating them correctly into your prose, etc. There are also chapters on writing about literature, on writing about business. And finally, the handbook gives examples of submitted papers in various professional styles of documentation: the MLA, the APA, and the CMS. (We will cover as much of this material as we can in our short semester, but I will regularly encourage you to keep this text throughout your college career so that you may refer to it whenever you have questions about punctuation, usage, grammar, organization, and so on.) We will begin using the handbook the second week of classes, so get one immediately.


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ENG 100(17): Composition I

instructor:  Nadia InserraMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
crn:  75708
focus:  FW
description: 

This course introduces you to writing at the college level and for an academic audience. In-class activities and assignments will focus in particular on 1-the analysis of academic and scholarly papers, 2-the use of library resources and research methodology, and 3-your development as an academic writer, including your ability to edit and proofread academic papers.

 

Writing assignments include 1-a critique paper based on assigned video/reading material; an image analysis essay; an argumentative essay; a research-based essay; an annotated bibliography; a PowerPoint presentation.

 

As we engage in scholarly conversations with other academic writers, we will also discuss the role of FOOD—particularly food and culture—in our daily lives and look at, and makes sense of, the current scholarship on the topic. The final research essay will engage this broad theme and make use of ethnographic methodology (such as fieldwork and interviews) in order to help us make sense of the role of food in our daily lives and within Hawai‘i’s communities. 


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ENG 100(18): Composition I

instructor:  Eve YoungdaleMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
crn:  71098
focus:  FW
description: 
One of the most useful skills developed in college is your ability to communicate written information effectively. Thus, in English 100, we will spend significant time concentrating on the process of how to write now, so you will be able to focus more of your time on what you are writing in future work. This course is designed to develop your college writing and critical thinking skills, and in it you will often focus on writing about topics of your own choosing. Thus, you should be interested in what you are researching and writing and should concentrate on topics which will enrich your life and understanding.

We will spend a large portion of our time together writing and revising. Writing is a process, and focusing on the individual steps of that process, such as brainstorming, creating a rough draft, editing, peer review, and revising to the final draft, is a significant key to creating a successful paper. This semester you will draft, and eventually revise, five essays ranging from two to six pages in length, each using a different approach. Approaches include a personal narrative essay, a rhetorical analysis of a documentary film, an op-ed argument essay, and a research essay with citations. We will also be frequently writing smaller pieces such as journal entries and other assignments geared toward the process of writing. Class will be both discussion and lecture based, thus students should expect to think on, write and talk about their writing every day. Regular attendance and participation is required. We will benefit from the wide variety of topics and ideas that each person brings to class and create an interesting, rich, and encouraging environment in which to gain greater confidence in writing.

Required Texts:

Ballenger, Bruce. The Curious Writer: The Brief Edition, 4th Edition. Boston: Longman, 2013.

Hacker, Diana, and Nancy I. Sommers. A Pocket Style Manual. 6th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2011.

A Note on Texts:

The Ballenger Curious Writer text (softcover 4th Brief edition--usually resalable) will be available at the UHM Bookstore or even through online rental, if you plan ahead.
(ISBN: 9780205876655)

The Hacker Brief Style Manual (6th edition) is an extremely useful citation and style guide for all of your college years. Most students get it at the UHM Bookstore or order it used (in advance) and do not sell it. You will need both texts throughout the semester.
(ISBN: 9780312542542)

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ENG 100(19): Composition I

instructor:  Amanda ChristieMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
crn:  75709
focus:  FW
description: 
Writing and Doing 

What do you like to write about? The answers to this question vary in detail but often boil down to what you like to do in everyday life. What we do and what we care enough to write about often directly relate to one another. In this class, the process of writing will be connected to tangible physical actions that take place inside and outside of the class. We will build things like robots and maps and diagrams as we talk about how a piece of writing is built and refined. We will walk through, observe, and take an active part in engaging with the communities around us as we connect what we do in everyday life with what we write. We will connect learning with doing and doing with writing in such a way, as to hopefully, make the words we put on the page this semester do something amazing!

 

Assignments:

There are 5 major writing assignments including a problem-solution essay, an annotated bibliography, an exploratory essay, a critical analysis paper, and a final research paper. You will also be required several short (often interactive) writing responses both inside and outside of class. All of the major assignments can be revised within this course. The aim of this course is to focus on the progression of writing and the final grade is based on that progression.

 

Course Texts & Supplies:

1). English 100 Course Reader

(available for purchase at Professional Image Printing)

2). Composition Notebook for journal assignments


Print

ENG 100(20): Composition I

instructor:  Eve YoungdaleMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
crn:  75712
focus:  FW
description: 
One of the most useful skills developed in college is your ability to communicate written information effectively. Thus, in English 100, we will spend significant time concentrating on the process of how to write now, so you will be able to focus more of your time on what you are writing in future work. This course is designed to develop your college writing and critical thinking skills, and in it you will often focus on writing about topics of your own choosing. Thus, you should be interested in what you are researching and writing and should concentrate on topics which will enrich your life and understanding.

We will spend a large portion of our time together writing and revising. Writing is a process, and focusing on the individual steps of that process, such as brainstorming, creating a rough draft, editing, peer review, and revising to the final draft, is a significant key to creating a successful paper. This semester you will draft, and eventually revise, five essays ranging from two to six pages in length, each using a different approach. Approaches include a personal narrative essay, a rhetorical analysis of a documentary film, an op-ed argument essay, and a research essay with citations. We will also be frequently writing smaller pieces such as journal entries and other assignments geared toward the process of writing. Class will be both discussion and lecture based, thus students should expect to think on, write and talk about their writing every day. Regular attendance and participation is required. We will benefit from the wide variety of topics and ideas that each person brings to class and create an interesting, rich, and encouraging environment in which to gain greater confidence in writing.

Required Texts:

Ballenger, Bruce. The Curious Writer: The Brief Edition, 4th Edition. Boston: Longman, 2013.

Hacker, Diana, and Nancy I. Sommers. A Pocket Style Manual. 6th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2011.

A Note on Texts:

The Ballenger Curious Writer text (softcover 4th Brief edition--usually resalable) will be available at the UHM Bookstore or even through online rental, if you plan ahead.
(ISBN: 9780205876655)

The Hacker Brief Style Manual (6th edition) is an extremely useful citation and style guide for all of your college years. Most students get it at the UHM Bookstore or order it used (in advance) and do not sell it. You will need both texts throughout the semester.
(ISBN: 9780312542542)

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ENG 100(21): Composition I

instructor:  Nadia InserraMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
crn:  71092
focus:  FW
description: 

This course introduces you to writing at the college level and for an academic audience. In-class activities and assignments will focus in particular on 1-the analysis of academic and scholarly papers, 2-the use of library resources and research methodology, and 3-your development as an academic writer, including your ability to edit and proofread academic papers.

 

Writing assignments include 1-a critique paper based on assigned video/reading material; an image analysis essay; an argumentative essay; a research-based essay; an annotated bibliography; a PowerPoint presentation.

 

As we engage in scholarly conversations with other academic writers, we will also discuss the role of FOOD—particularly food and culture—in our daily lives and look at, and makes sense of, the current scholarship on the topic. The final research essay will engage this broad theme and make use of ethnographic methodology (such as fieldwork and interviews) in order to help us make sense of the role of food in our daily lives and within Hawai‘i’s communities. 


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ENG 100(22): Composition I

instructor:  Brooks Britton
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
crn:  75713
focus:  FW
description: 
“The limits of my language mean the limits of my world” (Ludwig Wittgenstein).
“The greatest thing a human soul ever does in this world is to see something and tell what
it saw in a plain way […] To see clearly is poetry, prophecy and religion, all in one”
Description: The ability to inscribe thought into word and sentence remains one of
humanity’s greatest achievements. No matter the field of study or type of work, the
ability to condense our ideas onto a page that may be understood by someone else rests at
the heart of all we do. The purpose of this course is to introduce you to the power of the
written word in a variety of forms, and how different types of writing function in distinct
ways. We will explore the writing process itself to help refine our own ability to write,
learning about various rhetorical strategies and generic conventions, research methods
and typed of discourse, and about the demands of genre and how we might employ all of
these in our own writing. Above all else this course will focus on the process of writing,
how every piece of good writing is developmental, and that revision is a writer’s main
occupation. It will help you discover your own writing process, and aid you in refining it.
At the end of this course you will have gained the tools needed to write clear and concise
academic prose that will help you not only in your time at University, but in whatever
career you choose afterwards.
Requirements: Weekly writing assignments with peer revision. Group-projects and
presentations. 3 short essays: Autobiographical/Narrative. Observational/Descriptive.
Analytic/Argumentative and one longer research essay
(John Ruskin).

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ENG 100(23): Composition I

instructor:  Kapena LandgrafMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
crn:  71093
focus:  FW
description: 

Aloha,

Welcome to English 100 (Composition 1).  Writing is everywhere.  Though our use of it may be taken for granted, it is a functional element of communication.  Within contemporary society and culture, our understanding of writing and its processes have dramatically evolved.  Mediums of expression and production are becoming increasingly digital.  Nevertheless, to become an accomplished, conscious, and contributing member of society, a firm grasp of basic writing skills is necessary.  This course will involve various reading, journaling, and essay writing activities to hone and further develop a student’s preexisting writing skills and abilities.

This course will allow students to realize the functional purposes of writing in their lives – that writing is a process through which meanings of the world are constructed and communicated.  The course will begin with an introspective take on the life of the student via a personal narrative.  The course will then gradually shift from this individual-level investigation and work outward – to family, community, state, country, and beyond.  As each level is surveyed, students will have the opportunity to identify various types of rhetorical situations, strengthen their sense of awareness concerning audience, as well as advance their literary knowledge.

Course Objectives and Student Learning Outcomes:

1) To compose college-level writing, including, but not limited to, academic discourse, that achieves a specific purpose and responds adeptly to an identifiable audience.

2) Provide evidence of effective strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading a text in order to produce finished prose.

3) Compose an argument that makes use of source material that is relevant and credible and that is integrated in accordance with an appropriate style guide.

Assignments:

There are four (4) major writing assignments including a personal narrative, an exploratory paper, a critical analysis paper, and a final research paper.  Students will also be required to complete a creative project requiring them to articulate arguments made within their research paper.  For the creative project, students can be as inventive as they like in terms of medium, style, and technique.

Writing is an act that is seldom done in isolation.  This course will emphasize collaborative work during multiple stages of the writing process.  Certain class periods will be designated for peer review.  Copies of rough drafts will be required on these days for distribution to the instructor and a set number of peers.

Requirements:

1) Attendance and participation in discussions/classroom activities.  Attendance is mandatory.  More than four (4) unexcused absences will result in substantial grade deductions.

2) Consistent monitoring of e-mail correspondence and course section on Laulima website for updates, assignments, and reading materials.

3) Four (4) major papers (about 5-7 pages each), one creative project, and weekly Laulima “blog” responses.

Course Texts & Required Materials/Supplies:

1) Basic writing materials are necessary for in-class writing exercises and note-taking.

2) Access to the internet and UH’s Laulima course website.

3) Reading materials for the course will be distributed via Laulima for download in PDF format.  I anticipate that this course will not require the purchase of any textbook or reader, but this is a tentative description.  Every effort will be made to keep material costs to an absolute minimum.

Grading:

This course will be graded using a point value system in which all of the written assignments account for about 92% of a student’s final grade (including all four major papers, the creative project, and weekly Laulima responses).  Grades for this course will use pluses/minuses.  A strict ZERO TOLERANCE policy for plagiarism, cheating, or any other form of academic dishonesty is observed.

Disclaimer:  This is a tentative course description.  All contents and details are subject to change.  For the latest information on this course, contact the instructor KAPENA M. LANDGRAF at KAPENAML@HAWAII.EDU.


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ENG 100(24): Composition I

instructor:  Thuy Da LamMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
crn:  75714
focus:  FW
description: 

“Write, Read, Rewrite. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as Needed”—Susan Sontag’s directions for writing—will be a motto for our class, in which we will approach reading and writing as interrelated processes. Learning to write well begins with close reading. We will read short essays on relevant issues, not only for content but also for form, as possible models for our writing. We will analyze how successful writers use various rhetorical strategies to convey meaning. The essay assignments will give you practice in using a range of strategies to achieve specific purposes—to reflect, to inform, to analyze, and to persuade. You will learn how to draw on your readings as relevant and reliable sources to be integrated into your writing, following the MLA style guide. We will work on planning, drafting, and revising, with an emphasis on rewriting in order to produce clear and concise prose. We will also focus on issues of style, grammar, and mechanics that are specific to your writing. Essential to this course are our one-on-one conferences to discuss and guide your composition. 

Required Texts

  • Course Reader: ENG 100. Available at Marketing and Publication Services, on the campus of the University Laboratory School, UHM College of Education, 956-4969.
  • A Pocket Style Manual. 7th ed. Available at UHM Bookstore, Campus Center.

ENG 100(25): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
crn:  71100
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(26): Composition I

instructor:  Jade Higa
time:  MWF 2:30-3:20
crn:  73069
focus:  FW
description: 
ENG 100 is one of the most important classes you will take in college. Knowing how to read and
write well are life skills valued in every field: whether you’re putting together a lab report,
preparing a final paper, tweeting, texting, or just sending a short email, written words are usually
the first way you interact with people. This class will help you to better understand how to work
with words through reading assignments, small and large group discussions, in-class writing and
small homework assignments, research, and formal essays.
Requirements
1. Attendance and participation: you are required to be present both physically and mentally.
This means you show up to class with your work completed, you listen actively to the instructor
and your classmates, and you contribute regularly to discussion.
2. In-class work, homework, and quizzes: depending on the day, you may be asked to
demonstrate your knowledge of the required readings and in-class discussion through daily
assignments which may include (but is not limited to) group work, worksheets, blog posts,
quizzes, and free writing.
3. Presentation: there will be one 5-7 minute formal presentation during the semester.
4. Papers: you will have four formal essays between 2-10 pages (the length and difficulty of
these essays will increase throughout the semester). At least one of these papers will require you
to do research. In addition, you will be required to turn in early pieces of each paper (theses,
outlines, and rough drafts). Note: papers will be turned in online.
Texts
There are no required texts for this section of ENG 100. All readings can be accessed through
Laulima. If you would like to purchase a style guide, you may. Keep in mind, we will be using
only MLA format in our class. Suggested guide (can be purchased online): MLA Handbook for
Writers of Research Papers, 7th Edition.
Course Aims
1. Students will employ critical thinking in analysis of writing, in discussion, and in their own
essays.
2. Students will construct academic papers driven by clear theses and consisting of original ideas,
coherent arguments, clear language, and fully developed paragraphs.
3. Students will incorporate instructor and peer feedback as well as their own knowledge to
revise their own academic papers.
4. Students will learn to locate and appropriately integrate secondary materials into their
arguments.
5. Students will write with a focus on process rather than product.

ENG 100(27): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  MWF 2:30-3:20
crn:  76225
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(28): Composition I

instructor:  Thuy Da LamMore
time:  MWF 2:30-3:20
crn:  75715
focus:  FW
description: 

“Write, Read, Rewrite. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as Needed”—Susan Sontag’s directions for writing—will be a motto for our class, in which we will approach reading and writing as interrelated processes. Learning to write well begins with close reading. We will read short essays on relevant issues, not only for content but also for form, as possible models for our writing. We will analyze how successful writers use various rhetorical strategies to convey meaning. The essay assignments will give you practice in using a range of strategies to achieve specific purposes—to reflect, to inform, to analyze, and to persuade. You will learn how to draw on your readings as relevant and reliable sources to be integrated into your writing, following the MLA style guide. We will work on planning, drafting, and revising, with an emphasis on rewriting in order to produce clear and concise prose. We will also focus on issues of style, grammar, and mechanics that are specific to your writing. Essential to this course are our one-on-one conferences to discuss and guide your composition. 

Required Texts

  • Course Reader: ENG 100. Available at Marketing and Publication Services, on the campus of the University Laboratory School, UHM College of Education, 956-4969.
  • A Pocket Style Manual. 7th ed. Available at UHM Bookstore, Campus Center.

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ENG 100(29): Composition I

instructor:  Kelsey AmosMore
time:  TR 7:30-8:45
crn:  75716
focus:  FW
description: 

English 100-29 & 100-36 / Composition I

Fall 2015, Tuesday & Thursday

100-29 time: 7:30 am to 8:45 KUY 308

100-36 time: 10:30 am to 11:45 KUY 407


Kelsey Amos

808-222-5247

kmt.amos@gmail.com

Office Hours: Kuykendall 222 ??? and by appointment.


Course Description

This class will give you extensive practice in reading and writing college-level prose, with the aim of empowering you to critically interpret a variety of texts, map out and take part in intellectual conversations, engage with audiences through persuasion, and ultimately, be able to tell a story.


We'll start out this course by considering how the stories we hear and tell are intimately tied to what we think we know about the world and ourselves. As a case study in the rhetorical power of stories (aka representation) in public writing, we will delve into Hawaiʻi's rich archive by reading an assortment of texts throughout the semester that take part in public conversations. We will consider these texts and the stories they tell through intensive class discussion, allowing us to develop our critical reading skills together.


With a conversational rhythm established in the classroom, we will turn our attention to how the production of knowledge happens through conversations, whether they are academic debates, political controversies, or arguments among friends. We will examine the relationship of stories to conversations, and I will try to convince you that the process of researching a topic and making an argument is a process of mapping and positioning.


Finally, we will consider how we can express our positions in persuasive ways to specific audiences, with the aim of using our stories to create actual results in the world.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Compose college-level writing, including but not limited to, academic discourse, that achieves a specific purpose and responds adeptly to an identifiable audience.

  • Provide evidence of effective strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading a text in order to produce finished prose.

  • Compose an argument that makes use of source material that is relevant and credible and that is integrated in accordance with an appropriate style guide.

Course Requirements

This course will require that you write 4 short papers, including a critical reading of a text, a literature review, an argumentative piece in which you put forth your own new idea, and a persuasive text to be shared with a specific audience. Aspects of these four assignments will require collaborative writing, and may be supplemented with a presentation to the class.

All required texts will be provided in pdf form by me.


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ENG 100(30): Composition I

instructor:  Eric San GeorgeMore
time:  TR 7:30-8:45
crn:  73545
focus:  FW
description: 
This course is designed to introduce you to the demands of academic writing. You will learn how to evaluate sources, conduct and document original research, organize a paper around a clear and concise thesis, and identify rhetorical strategies that writers use to address and inform their audiences. Throughout the semester, you will review grammar, usage, mechanics, and punctuation in order to add clarity and authority to your writing. You will learn and improve these skills, in part, by working collaboratively with your peers on a number of informal and formal writing assignments and presentations.

Assignments include presenting on an aspect of English grammar, composing formal essays, developing a research project, proofreading peers’ papers, and discussing a range of readings in groups. Because writing is a process, you will submit drafts for each major writing assignment, and you will have the opportunity to rewrite or revise your papers after they have been graded and returned to you.

  • Graff, Gerald, and Cathy Birkenstein. "They Say, I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. 3rd. ed. New York: Norton, 2014. Print.
  • Hacker, Diana, and Nancy I. Sommers. A Pocket Style Manual. 6th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2011. Print.

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ENG 100(31): Composition I

instructor:  No‘u RevillaMore
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
crn:  74071
focus:  FW
description: 

Aloha mai. Welcome to English 100. This is a place-based composition course that will prepare you for the demands of university-level writing. As your instructor, I argue that place and community are foundational to identity, knowledge, and creativity. In this course, you will reflect on this argument as we cultivate writing habits, research techniques, and critical thinking skills and refine your literary practices.

MAJOR ASSIGNMENTS
- Home Narrative
- Aloha ‘Āina Compare & Contrast Paper
- Argumentative Research Project
- Proposal


REQUIRED MATERIALS
All course texts will be made available on Laulima. In addition to regular Internet access, you will be required to have a designated course notebook and a pen or pencil. I also recommend purchasing the most recent edition of Diana Hacker's A Pocket Style Manual.

This course follows a point system, with all work and participation worth 400 points. A grade chart will be provided to track your progress through the semester.


ENG 100(33): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
crn:  71096
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(34): Composition I

instructor:  Elizabeth SotoMore
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
crn:  74389
focus:  FW
description: 

The explicit goal of this course is to provide new college students the tools to prepare

you for your careers as college writers and readers. Underlying this goal, I hope we

will also find ways to further develop your interest in actively observing and participating in the

world we live in. We will examine how to be an active and critical reader of the information we

receive on a daily basis. We will question our assumptions. We will study our communication

styles, and we will attempt to look at the goals and methods found behind the continuous stream

of words and images we entertain for most of our waking lives. The primary focus of this course

is the research paper and the practice of revision. The research paper assignment will occupy the

first half of the semester. Revision is the heart of this class, so be forewarned, you will be writing

and re-writing and re-writing.


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ENG 100(35): Composition I

instructor:  Cornelius RubsamenMore
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
crn:  77066
focus:  FW
description: 

Description:

This course is designed to introduce students to college-level writing and is based on the assumption that all of us already engage in writing-related activities in our day-to-day lives—the editors of our textbook even go as far as to claim that everyonealready is an author. Although this may sound like an overstatement, it seems safe to say that the number of people who do not regularly engage in writing activities like blogging, emailing, or texting is dwindling. Even the most mundane writing task requires us to think rhetorically: e.g. what is the writer’s purpose and stance, who is the audience, and what is the context? Which genre and media are best suited for a particular purpose and audience? These are key questions that writers—both in digital forms of communication and in academia—routinely ask before composing texts. This course, then, will build on students’ experience in composing a variety of texts to provide them with the writing skills required to succeed in college.

Objectives:

In accordance with the Student Learning Outcomes for ENG 100, by the end of the course students will be expected to 1) compose college-level writing that achieves a specific purpose and responds adeptly to an identifiable audience; 2) provide evidence of effective strategies for generating, editing, and proofreading a text in order to produce finished prose; and 3) compose an argument that makes use of source material that is relevant and credible and that is integrated in accordance with an appropriate style guide. All assignments and course work are intended to help students meet these objectives.

Assignments:

Students in this course will engage in a variety of writing related tasks, both informal and formal. Informal writing assignments will include reading responses, discussion posts, and other “low stakes” written work. Formal writing assignments will include a review, an analytical essay, an argumentative essay, and a final research paper. In conjunction with the research paper, students will also submit an abstract, an annotated bibliography, and give an oral presentation to the class. Finally, there will be regular reading assignments, which will serve as the material for the informal writing assignments and for class discussion.

Course Requirements

  • Attendance and participation
  • Weekly informal papers
  • Four 4-5 page formal papers
  • Peer review workshops
  • Quizzes

Textbook:

Lunsford, Andrea, et al. Everyone’s an Author. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2013. ISBN: 978-0393932119.

The textbook will be available at the UHM bookstore.


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ENG 100(36): Composition I

instructor:  Kelsey AmosMore
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
crn:  71099
focus:  FW
description: 

English 100-29 & 100-36 / Composition I

Fall 2015, Tuesday & Thursday

100-29 time: 7:30 am to 8:45 KUY 308

100-36 time: 10:30 am to 11:45 KUY 407


Kelsey Amos

808-222-5247

kmt.amos@gmail.com

Office Hours: Kuykendall 222 ??? and by appointment.


Course Description

This class will give you extensive practice in reading and writing college-level prose, with the aim of empowering you to critically interpret a variety of texts, map out and take part in intellectual conversations, engage with audiences through persuasion, and ultimately, be able to tell a story.


We'll start out this course by considering how the stories we hear and tell are intimately tied to what we think we know about the world and ourselves. As a case study in the rhetorical power of stories (aka representation) in public writing, we will delve into Hawaiʻi's rich archive by reading an assortment of texts throughout the semester that take part in public conversations. We will consider these texts and the stories they tell through intensive class discussion, allowing us to develop our critical reading skills together.


With a conversational rhythm established in the classroom, we will turn our attention to how the production of knowledge happens through conversations, whether they are academic debates, political controversies, or arguments among friends. We will examine the relationship of stories to conversations, and I will try to convince you that the process of researching a topic and making an argument is a process of mapping and positioning.


Finally, we will consider how we can express our positions in persuasive ways to specific audiences, with the aim of using our stories to create actual results in the world.

Student Learning Outcomes

  • Compose college-level writing, including but not limited to, academic discourse, that achieves a specific purpose and responds adeptly to an identifiable audience.

  • Provide evidence of effective strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proofreading a text in order to produce finished prose.

  • Compose an argument that makes use of source material that is relevant and credible and that is integrated in accordance with an appropriate style guide.

Course Requirements

This course will require that you write 4 short papers, including a critical reading of a text, a literature review, an argumentative piece in which you put forth your own new idea, and a persuasive text to be shared with a specific audience. Aspects of these four assignments will require collaborative writing, and may be supplemented with a presentation to the class.

All required texts will be provided in pdf form by me.


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ENG 100(37): Composition I

instructor:  Melinda SmithMore
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
crn:  71097
focus:  FW
description: 
Welcome to English 100! This course is designed to introduce you to a variety of cultural perspectives and to teach you how to critically analyze all the texts you read. Our course material will include literature, popular culture, and ethnographic texts, all chosen to help you think about issues of power, ideology, and difference within and between cultures. Although this is an English class, the texts and issues we will be dealing with are interdisciplinary, and you will be able to use the analytical skills gained in this class in other courses, as well as in your life in general.  In addition to learning how to analyze a variety of texts, you will also produce several types of writing (including a journal, informal writing pieces, and formal essays) to show you how each genre can be utilized to your benefit, both in and outside of academia. Upon completion of this course, you will be able to recognize and understand ideologies and biases inherent in texts, have the skills to analyze the details of texts to understand their messages, produce several forms of writing relevant to various situations, and understand the multiple roles writing can play in academic and regular life.

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ENG 100(38): Composition I

instructor:  Steven HolmesMore
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
crn:  71094
focus:  FW
description: 
Aristotle defines rhetoric as the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion. In turn, this course will teach you to identify the rhetorical strategies available in select discursive genres.  Although this course will focus on the mode of argumentative writing, the impetus behind this choice of genre is to help you build your skills in analytic and inductive reasoning, utilize university resources, document evidence to support your reasoning, and hone your research methods.

A large part of this class will encourage you to actively participate in a research community. As such, as the class progresses, your research questions and your research interests will take part in shaping the class. To warm up to this, we will begin the class by focusing on different modules.  In the first module, we will focus on interviewing professionals in a field you are interested in. In the second unit, we will read short stories and reflect on the processes of composition. The final unit of the course will be a research paper based on the students' interest. 

The majority of the grade for this class will be based three major writing assignments.  Two of these writing assignments will be analytic essays to help build the writing skills you will use throughout your college journey. Through these assignments, you will complete the hallmarks of the written communication foundation. You will become familiar with composition methods, strategies for finding academic sources, and with the resources of the UH Manoa Library.  Since a large part of research is based on reading comprehension, there will be some additional evaluative methods as well, including online postings to a course website hosted through Laulima.

 

Required Texts:

A course reader available from Professional Image (phone 973-6599).


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ENG 100(39): Composition I

instructor:  Jaimie GusmanMore
time:  TR 12:00-1:15
crn:  71095
focus:  FW
description: 
Description
Many successful writers constantly ask themselves: Why should I write? What should
I write? How do I write? No matter the genre, asking these questions is central to
developing a writer’s practice. In this course, you will contemplate these questions
as you cultivate and refine your writing process, while investigating your deepest
interests and concerns.
This ENG100 course will focus on two major aspects of communicative writing: (1)
writing in and for “academia” and (2) writing in and for the world outside of the
academic institution. With practice, you will improve your writing in both grammar
and style. Your assignments are designed to help you as a first year writing student
at the university, but also as a participant in the larger community. The assignments
are intended to expand both your critical thinking and creative eye.
Assignments
You will have 5 major assignments: (1.) Rhetorical Analysis Paper, (2.) Personal
Narrative, (3.) Literature Review & Group Presentation, (4.) Letter for Change, and
(5.) Argumentative Research Paper. You will also have smaller in-class assignments,
peer workshops, grammar quizzes, and group discussions, making attendance and
participation a necessary component in fostering a dynamic classroom
environment.
Course Texts and Supplies
All texts will be provided for you, accessible via our class website and/or our
Laulima class website

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ENG 100(40): Composition I

instructor:  Jacquelyn ChappelMore
time:  TR 12:00-1:15
crn:  71091
focus:  FW
description: 

This introductory course in composition prepares students for the writing to be undertaken in their undergraduate coursework and provides an introduction to the rhetorical, conceptual and stylistic demands of writing at the university level including composing, researching, and utilizing sources. During the course students will practice and peer edit their personal, expository, analytical and persuasive research writing, paying attention to the elements that make for good writing in any genre.

Students in the course will be assessed on their:

  • Attendance and participation
  • Informal writing assignments
  • Peer editing/workshopping
  • Four formal essays

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ENG 100(41): Composition I

instructor:  Rajiv MohabirMore
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
crn:  73546
focus:  FW
description: 

In this composition course the primary focus will be on engaging with the environments around us as writers and in doing so to refine your writing skills through the course’s various writing assignments. We will begin with narrative writing and end the semester with a research project of your own design.

You will have the opportunity to think and write creatively through our discussions of place. The idea for this class is that writing is a process. We will highlight this process by focusing on brainstorming, writing rough drafts, editing, participating in peer review, and revising final drafts.

The goal of this class is to prepare you for academic writing, allowing you to participate in discussion at the university level by honing your close reading, critical thinking, and rhetorical analysis skills.


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ENG 100(42): Composition I

instructor:  Cornelius RubsamenMore
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
crn:  74212
focus:  FW
description: 

Description:

This course is designed to introduce students to college-level writing and is based on the assumption that all of us already engage in writing-related activities in our day-to-day lives—the editors of our textbook even go as far as to claim that everyonealready is an author. Although this may sound like an overstatement, it seems safe to say that the number of people who do not regularly engage in writing activities like blogging, emailing, or texting is dwindling. Even the most mundane writing task requires us to think rhetorically: e.g. what is the writer’s purpose and stance, who is the audience, and what is the context? Which genre and media are best suited for a particular purpose and audience? These are key questions that writers—both in digital forms of communication and in academia—routinely ask before composing texts. This course, then, will build on students’ experience in composing a variety of texts to provide them with the writing skills required to succeed in college.

Objectives:

In accordance with the Student Learning Outcomes for ENG 100, by the end of the course students will be expected to 1) compose college-level writing that achieves a specific purpose and responds adeptly to an identifiable audience; 2) provide evidence of effective strategies for generating, editing, and proofreading a text in order to produce finished prose; and 3) compose an argument that makes use of source material that is relevant and credible and that is integrated in accordance with an appropriate style guide. All assignments and course work are intended to help students meet these objectives.

Assignments:

Students in this course will engage in a variety of writing related tasks, both informal and formal. Informal writing assignments will include reading responses, discussion posts, and other “low stakes” written work. Formal writing assignments will include a review, an analytical essay, an argumentative essay, and a final research paper. In conjunction with the research paper, students will also submit an abstract, an annotated bibliography, and give an oral presentation to the class. Finally, there will be regular reading assignments, which will serve as the material for the informal writing assignments and for class discussion.

Course Requirements

  • Attendance and participation
  • Weekly informal papers
  • Four 4-5 page formal papers
  • Peer review workshops
  • Quizzes

Textbook:

Lunsford, Andrea, et al. Everyone’s an Author. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2013. ISBN: 978-0393932119.

The textbook will be available at the UHM bookstore.


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ENG 100(43): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
crn:  74434
focus:  FW
description: 
Description
Many successful writers constantly ask themselves: Why should I write? What should
I write? How do I write? No matter the genre, asking these questions is central to
developing a writer’s practice. In this course, you will contemplate these questions
as you cultivate and refine your writing process, while investigating your deepest
interests and concerns.
This ENG100 course will focus on two major aspects of communicative writing: (1)
writing in and for “academia” and (2) writing in and for the world outside of the
academic institution. With practice, you will improve your writing in both grammar
and style. Your assignments are designed to help you as a first year writing student
at the university, but also as a participant in the larger community. The assignments
are intended to expand both your critical thinking and creative eye.
Assignments
You will have 5 major assignments: (1.) Rhetorical Analysis Paper, (2.) Personal
Narrative, (3.) Literature Review & Group Presentation, (4.) Letter for Change, and
(5.) Argumentative Research Paper. You will also have smaller in-class assignments,
peer workshops, grammar quizzes, and group discussions, making attendance and
participation a necessary component in fostering a dynamic classroom
environment.
Course Texts and Supplies
All texts will be provided for you, accessible via our class website and/or our
Laulima class website

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ENG 100(44): Composition I ONLINE: Writing and Youth Culture

instructor:  Steven GinMore
time: 
crn:  78182
focus:  FW
description: 

This class is intended to develop your skills in writing, reasoning, argumentation, and research, which prepares you to express yourself clearly, strongly and persuasively in various academic contexts as well as in your career and the rest of your life. The assignments will cover many of the skills necessary for research-based composition and you will have practice writing in various genres.

This is an online class. For the whole semester, all interaction with your instructor and your classmates will be by way of the UH Laulima and the Enhanced InSite systems. I will also be available through scheduled chat sessions on Laulima and via email, phone, or Skype.

You will need to discipline yourself and manage your time carefully. On-campus Spring session classes meet three times per week. This online class will demand the same amount of time, even though we’re not meeting in a classroom.


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ENG 100(45): Composition I ONLINE: Writing and Youth Culture

instructor:  Steven GinMore
time: 
crn:  78183
focus:  FW
description: 

This class is intended to develop your skills in writing, reasoning, argumentation, and research, which prepares you to express yourself clearly, strongly and persuasively in various academic contexts as well as in your career and the rest of your life. The assignments will cover many of the skills necessary for research-based composition and you will have practice writing in various genres.

This is an online class. For the whole semester, all interaction with your instructor and your classmates will be by way of the UH Laulima and the Enhanced InSite systems. I will also be available through scheduled chat sessions on Laulima and via email, phone, or Skype.

You will need to discipline yourself and manage your time carefully. On-campus Spring session classes meet three times per week. This online class will demand the same amount of time, even though we’re not meeting in a classroom.


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ENG 100A(1): Composition I Honors

instructor:  Karyl GarlandMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
crn:  71101
focus:  FW
description: 
Each student taking English 100A will strengthen in his or her ability to read and write with precision and clarity. You will be invited, through major and minor writing assignments, to consider your audience and uncover the most effective delivery for your message. Through research-based essay assignments, you will further your knowledge about how to find and use outside sources, beyond your own experience and knowledge, that are both reliable and scholarly and how to cite these sources using Modern Language Association (MLA) formatting. You will be asked to create time for writing that will be sufficient for composing written pieces that are clear and well revised. You will also be asked to reflect on the process you go through as you write and to learn about yourself and how you think through this reflection. As this is an honors course, you will need to demonstrate an elevated level of commitment both in class and out to create final written pieces that are particularly thoughtful and free from error in grammar, punctuation, and syntax.

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ENG 100A(2): Composition I Honors

instructor:  Steven HolmesMore
time:  TR 12:00-1:15
crn:  78169
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at holmes.stevend@gmail.com

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ENG 190(1): Composition for Transfer Students

instructor:  Kim CompocMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
crn:  74877
focus:  FW
description: 

 

Welcome to English 190!

This class is designed to help you take charge of your writing so you can express yourself with clarity and precision. I believe we all have the potential to write beautiful and persuasive essays if given enough time to practice, get help, and revise. This class will give you ample opportunities to do so in a supportive and welcoming environment. I believe that by improving our research and writing skills, we deepen our engagement with the world at large. Even more, it can be fun!

A key task for composition class is learning about rhetorical strategies and understanding your audience. I also emphasize thorough research, analytical reflection and creative expression. All readings will be posted online and will include a wide range of topics from technical advice to current events.

We will have four main writing assignments. Additionally there will be a final essay, which will be a revision of a previous assignment. Students will also be graded on class participation, including posts on Laulima about the readings and each other’s work. Class time will also include short lectures, peer review, small group work, quiet-time writing exercises, student presentations, large group discussion and trips to the library.


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ENG 190(2): Composition for Transfer Students

instructor:  Jacquelyn ChappelMore
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
crn:  75717
focus:  FW
description: 

This introductory course in composition prepares students for the writing to be undertaken in their undergraduate coursework and provides an introduction to the rhetorical, conceptual and stylistic demands of writing at the university level including composing, researching, and utilizing sources. During the course students will practice and peer edit their personal, expository, analytical and persuasive research writing, paying attention to the elements that make for good writing in any genre.

Students in the course will be assessed on their:

  • Attendance and participation
  • Informal writing assignments
  • Peer editing/workshopping
  • Four formal essays