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Fall Semester 2015

The following descriptions of individual courses and sections supplement the general catalog descriptions. For the complete registration listings with CRNs and prerequisites, see the official schedule.

ENG 100ENG 200ENG 270-273ENG 300ENG 400Graduate  

Composition I and Honors Program

  • ENGLISH 100: Composition I
  • ENGLISH 100A: Honors Program. Contact the Honors Office at 956-8391 for information.
  • ENGLISH 190: Composition I for Transfer Students to UH Manoa

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ENG 100(1): Composition I

instructor:  Michael PakMore
time:  MWF 7:30-8:20
crn:  71086
focus:  FW
description: 
COURSE DESCRIPTION
English 100 is an introduction to composition. We will be studying different modes of writing, which include life writing, professional writing, and argumentative writing.

REQUIREMENTS
-Attendance, participation, and short writing responses
-Five papers, meta-commentaries, and peer reviews
-Keeping current through email and Laulima

READINGS

Class readings will be all digital, available online and through Laulima. It is your responsibility to bring these to class, either printed out or as an electronic format.

PAPERS

There are five papers in this class, each between 3-5 pages long. All papers will be accompanied by a short meta-commentary. Working with peers is an important literacy and our classroom will be very collaborative. Since we will be peer reviewing papers in class, you need to bring three printed hardcopies of your paper when the draft is due (one for me, two for your peers).

GRADING POLICY
Your grade will be 80% from your papers (including the drafts, meta-commentaries, and peer reviews), and 20% from attendance and class participation. I use pluses/minuses in my grading and follow UH Manoa's policies on plagiarism. Deliberate cheating could result in your failing the course plus your being subject to further university disciplinary action.

For more information on this course, contact the instructor at pakm@hawaii.edu

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ENG 100(2): Composition I

instructor:  Chris KelseyMore
time:  MWF 7:30-8:20
crn:  76224
focus:  FW
description: 

ENG 100 Composition I

MWF, Section 002, 7:30-8:20  Dr. Christopher Kelsey

The Three R’s: Reading, Reasoning, and ‘Riting

The course’s general aims are twofold: to strengthen students’ writing and to have them produce it at a functional level consistent with the university’s expectations.  Core course elements are:

            *an engaged reception of selected works

            *an awareness of the varieties of English, their uses and significance

            *an ability to produce writing appropriate to an academic context and                                                   readership.

This class will emphasize analytical/argumentative writing along with personal/experiential writing.  There will be several required conferences. Students will freewrite at the end of class on a regular basis. A daily reading schedule will be affected through a discussion-based pedagogy, small-group and class-wide.

Course Requirements

 

·      Attendance and participation

·      Six short essays

·      Three medium-length essays

·      A final portfolio

Required Texts

 

·      Course Reader (available from Professional Image, 2633 S. King Street)

·      A thin writing tablet

 

 

 

The writing asignments will consist of six short essays and three mid-range essays.  In addition, a selection of these papers will be revised and resubmitted in the form of a final portfolio.


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ENG 100(3): Composition I

instructor:  Chris KelseyMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
crn:  75705
focus:  FW
description: 

ENG 100 Composition I

MWF, Section 003, 8:30-9:20   Dr. Christopher Kelsey

The Three R’s: Reading, Reasoning, and ‘Riting

The course’s general aims are twofold: to strengthen students’ writing and to have them produce it at a functional level consistent with the university’s expectations.  Core course elements are:

            *an engaged reception of selected works

            *an awareness of the varieties of English, their uses and significance

            *an ability to produce writing appropriate to an academic context and                                                   readership.

This class will emphasize analytical/argumentative writing along with personal/experiential writing.  There will be several required conferences. Students will freewrite at the end of class on a regular basis. A daily reading schedule will be affected through a discussion-based pedagogy, small-group and class-wide.

Course Requirements

 

·      Attendance and participation

·      Six short essays

·      Three medium-length essays

·      A final portfolio

Required Texts

 

·      Course Reader (available from Professional Image, 2633 S. King Street)

·      A thin writing tablet

 

 

 

The writing asignments will consist of six short essays and three mid-range essays.  In addition, a selection of these papers will be revised and resubmitted in the form of a final portfolio.


ENG 100(4): Composition I

instructor:  Julia WietingMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
crn:  73634
focus:  FW

ENG 100(5): Composition I

instructor:  Lisa SheaMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
crn:  75706
focus:  FW

ENG 100(6): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  MWF 9:30-10:20
crn:  75707
focus:  FW

ENG 100(8): Composition I

instructor:  Donovan CollepsMore
time:  MWF 9:30-10:20
crn:  71088
focus:  FW

ENG 100(9): Composition I

instructor:  Jamaica OsorioMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
crn:  74070
focus:  FW

ENG 100(10): Composition I

instructor:  Amanda ChristieMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
crn:  74387
focus:  FW

ENG 100(11): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
crn:  74388
focus:  FW

ENG 100(12): Composition I

instructor:  Karyl ReynoldsMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
crn:  79645
focus:  FW

ENG 100(13): Composition I

instructor:  Janet GrahamMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
crn:  74200
focus:  FW

ENG 100(14): Composition I

instructor:  Edward LeeMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
crn:  74128
focus:  FW

ENG 100(15): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
crn:  71090
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(16): Composition I

instructor:  Theo GarneauMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
crn:  71087
focus:  FW
description: 

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND GOALS

This course aims to be a comprehensive college-level composition course, offering students 

  • a varied and provocative reading and writing agenda; a thorough introduction to gr­ammatical, rhetorical, and stylistic basics of writing in a university community; 
  • a solid introduction to research using reliable sources from university libraries and the Internet; 
  • an opportunity to work regularly in groups with fellow students and in conference with the instructor; 
  • a forum to share reactions and explore issues in an open and supportive atmosphere.


This is not a themecourse. Rather than exploring in depth one subject throughout the semester (gender construction, folklore, or sustainability, for instance), this course will offer an eclectic and hopefully engaging mix of readings on politics, race, society, commerce, language, sports, sexuality, drugs, music, and so on. We will also mix and match genres, analyzing speeches, memoirs, short stories, encomia and invective, business memos, and essays galore: expository, analytical, argumentative, some written by professors, some written by students. Perhaps the only constant will be the high quality of the writing. Each piece we read will offer unique lessons in style and clarity, subtlety and depth, construction, correctness, and persuasiveness.

In addition to our regular in-class work of writing in various modes (freewriting, directed writing, collaborative writing, brainstorming, summarizing readings and individual class sessions, etc.), students will submit twenty pages of polished prose (five three-page papers in various rhetorical modes and one five-page research paper); they will workshop each othersessays, give several group presentations, and take ten quizzes.

Regarding the three-page papers: I’m asking for five concise three-page essays (right to the bottom of page three, but not spilling onto page four). These are due at the beginning of the five classes specified below in the tentative schedule. There will be separate prompts for each essay, but all of your essays should incorporate the analyses of the readings that we will have done in class. I strongly suggest, therefore, that you take careful notes on our discussions. We will workshop these essays in order to refine our skills of attentive reading and listening, of giving and receiving feedback. You will turn in to me the improved draft in the next class session.


COURSE WORK

Final grades will be determined by the following criteria:

  • Five three-page papers—drafts and rewrites (30%)
  • One five-page documented research paper (20%)
  • In-class participation: discussion groups, draft response/peer review groups (15%). Students who are absent for their groups work will lose 3% for each absence.
  • Ten quizzes (25%). Quizzes are given at the beginning of the class; quizzes missed due to tardiness or unexcused absences cannot be made up. A grade of zero is given for missed quizzes.
  • Collected in-class writings (10%)


REQUIRED TEXTS

Class readings are available on-line and free at our UH Laulima page under Resources > Class Readings. You are not obliged to print these texts, but if our classroom does not have computer terminals for each student, please bring an electronic device that allows you to access the text.

The Brief Penguin Handbook With Exercises (Includes 2009 MLA Updates) is an absolutely required text (available at the campus bookstore and online). This more than 600-page handbook offers chapters on grammar, mechanics, punctuation, style, and writing effective phrases, clauses, sentences, and paragraphs. Some chapters explore the basics of rhetoric, structuring essays, writing drafts, rewriting, and editing; other chapters treat the art of research: finding and evaluating sources, using sources responsibly, integrating them correctly into your prose, etc. There are also chapters on writing about literature, on writing about business. And finally, the handbook gives examples of submitted papers in various professional styles of documentation: the MLA, the APA, and the CMS. (We will cover as much of this material as we can in our short semester, but I will regularly encourage you to keep this text throughout your college career so that you may refer to it whenever you have questions about punctuation, usage, grammar, organization, and so on.) We will begin using the handbook the second week of classes, so get one immediately.


ENG 100(17): Composition I

instructor:  Nadia InserraMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
crn:  75708
focus:  FW

ENG 100(18): Composition I

instructor:  Eve YoungdaleMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
crn:  71098
focus:  FW

ENG 100(19): Composition I

instructor:  Amanda ChristieMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
crn:  75709
focus:  FW

ENG 100(20): Composition I

instructor:  Eve YoungdaleMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
crn:  75712
focus:  FW

ENG 100(21): Composition I

instructor:  Nadia InserraMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
crn:  71092
focus:  FW

ENG 100(22): Composition I

instructor:  Maile GreshamMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
crn:  75713
focus:  FW

ENG 100(23): Composition I

instructor:  Kapena LandgrafMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
crn:  71093
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(24): Composition I

instructor:  Thuy Da LamMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
crn:  75714
focus:  FW
description: 

“Write, Read, Rewrite. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as Needed”—Susan Sontag’s directions for writing—will be a motto for our class, in which we will approach reading and writing as interrelated processes. Learning to write well begins with close reading. We will read short essays on relevant issues, not only for content but also for form, as possible models for our writing. We will analyze how successful writers use various rhetorical strategies to convey meaning. The essay assignments will give you practice in using a range of strategies to achieve specific purposes—to reflect, to inform, to analyze, and to persuade. You will learn how to draw on your readings as relevant and reliable sources to be integrated into your writing, following the MLA style guide. We will work on planning, drafting, and revising, with an emphasis on rewriting in order to produce clear and concise prose. We will also focus on issues of style, grammar, and mechanics that are specific to your writing. Essential to this course are our one-on-one conferences to discuss and guide your composition. 

Required Texts

  • Course Reader: ENG 100. Available at Marketing and Publication Services, on the campus of the University Laboratory School, UHM College of Education, 956-4969.
  • A Pocket Style Manual. 7th ed. Available at UHM Bookstore, Campus Center.

ENG 100(25): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
crn:  71100
focus:  FW

ENG 100(26): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  MWF 2:30-3:20
crn:  73069
focus:  FW

ENG 100(27): Composition I

instructor:  Maile GreshamMore
time:  MWF 2:30-3:20
crn:  76225
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(28): Composition I

instructor:  Thuy Da LamMore
time:  MWF 2:30-3:20
crn:  75715
focus:  FW
description: 

“Write, Read, Rewrite. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as Needed”—Susan Sontag’s directions for writing—will be a motto for our class, in which we will approach reading and writing as interrelated processes. Learning to write well begins with close reading. We will read short essays on relevant issues, not only for content but also for form, as possible models for our writing. We will analyze how successful writers use various rhetorical strategies to convey meaning. The essay assignments will give you practice in using a range of strategies to achieve specific purposes—to reflect, to inform, to analyze, and to persuade. You will learn how to draw on your readings as relevant and reliable sources to be integrated into your writing, following the MLA style guide. We will work on planning, drafting, and revising, with an emphasis on rewriting in order to produce clear and concise prose. We will also focus on issues of style, grammar, and mechanics that are specific to your writing. Essential to this course are our one-on-one conferences to discuss and guide your composition. 

Required Texts

  • Course Reader: ENG 100. Available at Marketing and Publication Services, on the campus of the University Laboratory School, UHM College of Education, 956-4969.
  • A Pocket Style Manual. 7th ed. Available at UHM Bookstore, Campus Center.

ENG 100(29): Composition I

instructor:  Kelsey AmosMore
time:  TR 7:30-8:45
crn:  75716
focus:  FW

ENG 100(30): Composition I

instructor:  Eric San GeorgeMore
time:  TR 7:30-8:45
crn:  73545
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(31): Composition I

instructor:  No‘u RevillaMore
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
crn:  74071
focus:  FW
description: 

Aloha mai. Welcome to English 100. This is a place-based composition course that will prepare you for the demands of university-level writing.

         As your instructor, I argue that place is foundational to identity, knowledge, and creativity, and will emphasize the role of place in our work. ‘Āina is that which feeds. As we cultivate writing habits, research techniques, and critical thinking skills, we will reflect on how place has fed us, physically, intellectually, and culturally.

         We will begin the semester with a brief but valuable narrative of your definition of home. Indeed, the knowledge each of us brings to the classroom has been shaped in many ways by the places where we have lived, worked, created, suffered loss, changed our minds, took risks, and evolved. Our first major assignment asks you to explore these connections in a home narrative. Subsequently, an interview project will open your story to incorporate another layer of experience and knowledge in a formal profile and oral presentation.

         You will also produce a comparative image analysis of advertising images that attempt to “sell” Hawai‘i. We will critically discuss issues of representation.

         Lastly, the research project will build on your narrative and analytical skills while introducing you to the demands of research, collaborative work, and an oral presentation. Throughout the semester, we will identify and refine our literacy practices as well as challenge our assumptions about place and knowledge.

     In this active learning environment, passionate discussions will occur. Our classroom is a safe and supportive space, and we must all be respectful of each other. Remember, we are not only developing as writers but also as critical thinkers.  So while we may disagree, it is important that we listen to each other and exchange ideas in considerate ways.


ENG 100(33): Composition I

instructor:  Rebecca EvansMore
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
crn:  71096
focus:  FW

ENG 100(34): Composition I

instructor:  Elizabeth SotoMore
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
crn:  74389
focus:  FW

ENG 100(35): Composition I

instructor:  Cornelius RubsamenMore
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
crn:  77066
focus:  FW

ENG 100(36): Composition I

instructor:  Kelsey AmosMore
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
crn:  71099
focus:  FW

ENG 100(37): Composition I

instructor:  Melinda SmithMore
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
crn:  71097
focus:  FW

ENG 100(38): Composition I

instructor:  Steven HolmesMore
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
crn:  71094
focus:  FW

ENG 100(39): Composition I

instructor:  David ScrivnerMore
time:  TR 12:00-1:15
crn:  71095
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(40): Composition I

instructor:  Jacquelyn ChappelMore
time:  TR 12:00-1:15
crn:  71091
focus:  FW
description: 

This introductory course in composition prepares students for the writing to be undertaken in their undergraduate coursework and provides an introduction to the rhetorical, conceptual and stylistic demands of writing at the university level including composing, researching, and utilizing sources. During the course students will practice and peer edit their personal, expository, analytical and persuasive research writing, paying attention to the elements that make for good writing in any genre.

Students in the course will be assessed on their:

  • Attendance and participation
  • Informal writing assignments
  • Peer editing/workshopping
  • Four formal essays

ENG 100(41): Composition I

instructor:  Rajiv MohabirMore
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
crn:  73546
focus:  FW

ENG 100(42): Composition I

instructor:  Cornelius RubsamenMore
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
crn:  74212
focus:  FW

ENG 100(43): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
crn:  74434
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(44): Composition I ONLINE: Writing and Youth Culture

instructor:  Steven GinMore
time: 
crn:  78182
focus:  FW
description: 

This class is intended to develop your skills in writing, reasoning, argumentation, and research, which prepares you to express yourself clearly, strongly and persuasively in various academic contexts as well as in your career and the rest of your life. The assignments will cover many of the skills necessary for research-based composition and you will have practice writing in various genres.

This is an online class. For the whole semester, all interaction with your instructor and your classmates will be by way of the UH Laulima and the Enhanced InSite systems. I will also be available through scheduled chat sessions on Laulima and via email, phone, or Skype.

You will need to discipline yourself and manage your time carefully. On-campus Spring session classes meet three times per week. This online class will demand the same amount of time, even though we’re not meeting in a classroom.


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ENG 100(45): Composition I ONLINE: Writing and Youth Culture

instructor:  Steven GinMore
time: 
crn:  78183
focus:  FW
description: 

This class is intended to develop your skills in writing, reasoning, argumentation, and research, which prepares you to express yourself clearly, strongly and persuasively in various academic contexts as well as in your career and the rest of your life. The assignments will cover many of the skills necessary for research-based composition and you will have practice writing in various genres.

This is an online class. For the whole semester, all interaction with your instructor and your classmates will be by way of the UH Laulima and the Enhanced InSite systems. I will also be available through scheduled chat sessions on Laulima and via email, phone, or Skype.

You will need to discipline yourself and manage your time carefully. On-campus Spring session classes meet three times per week. This online class will demand the same amount of time, even though we’re not meeting in a classroom.


ENG 100A(1): Composition I Honors

instructor:  Karyl ReynoldsMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
crn:  71101
focus:  FW

ENG 100A(2): Composition I Honors

instructor:  Rebecca EvansMore
time:  TR 12:00-1:15
crn:  78169
focus:  FW

ENG 190(1): Composition for Transfer Students

instructor:  Kim CompocMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
crn:  74877
focus:  FW

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ENG 190(2): Composition for Transfer Students

instructor:  Jacquelyn ChappelMore
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
crn:  75717
focus:  FW
description: 

This introductory course in composition prepares students for the writing to be undertaken in their undergraduate coursework and provides an introduction to the rhetorical, conceptual and stylistic demands of writing at the university level including composing, researching, and utilizing sources. During the course students will practice and peer edit their personal, expository, analytical and persuasive research writing, paying attention to the elements that make for good writing in any genre.

Students in the course will be assessed on their:

  • Attendance and participation
  • Informal writing assignments
  • Peer editing/workshopping
  • Four formal essays