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Courses

Upcoming Courses | Catalog and Rotation | Archive

Fall Semester 2014

The following descriptions of individual courses and sections supplement the general catalog descriptions. For the complete registration listings with CRNs and prerequisites, see the official schedule.

ENG 100ENG 200ENG 270-273ENG 300ENG 400Graduate  

Composition I and Honors Program

  • ENGLISH 100: Composition I
  • ENGLISH 100A: Honors Program. Contact the Honors Office at 956-8391 for information.
  • ENGLISH 190: Composition I for Transfer Students to UH Manoa

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ENG 100(2): Composition I

instructor:  Chris KelseyMore
time:  MWF 7:30-8:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at

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ENG 100(3): Composition I

instructor:  Chris KelseyMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at

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ENG 100(4): Composition I

instructor:  Anna FeuersteinMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at annamf@hawaii.edu

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ENG 100(5): Composition I

instructor:  Amanda Adams-HandyMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
focus:  FW
description: 

Writing makes a difference.

Everyday we write. Whether we write a new status update for our Facebook accounts, compose a quick email to a friend, think up a few new song lyrics while singing in the shower and then jot them down later, or write an essay for a school assignment, we all write. In this class, I want us all to see that writing is a task that we continually use to make meaning of our world and to communicate those newly-made meanings to others.  Connecting writings’ important purpose with the acts of reading and writing that make up our daily lives and with our own actions for social change, I, ultimately, want us to see within this class that writing makes a tremendous difference.

 

Course Objectives:

1). To continually develop and refine writing skills by practicing with various written forms, including creative journal entries, blogs, journalism articles, personal narratives, poems, and song lyrics. 

2). To become skilled in crafting the organization, content, and mechanics of the critical analysis and research essay forms.

3). To cultivate close, careful reading skills through the analysis and discussion of various texts including news articles, blogs, photographs, memoirs, short stories, poems, song lyrics, short video clips and ads, essays, and the novel.

 

Assignments:

There are 4 major writing assignments including a personal narrative, an exploratory essay, a critical analysis paper, and a final research paper. You will also be required to complete a Social Action Project and several short writing responses both inside and outside of class. All of the assignments can be revised within this course, and included in the final portfolio for a higher grade. The aim of this course is to focus on the progression of writing and the final grade is based on that progression.

 

Course Texts & Supplies:

1). English 100 Course Reader

(available for purchase at Professional Image Printing)

2). Composition Notebook for journal assignments

3). Notebook and Pencil for taking notes in class


Print

ENG 100(6): Composition I

instructor:  Jacquelyn ChappelMore
time:  MWF 9:30-10:20
focus:  FW
description: 

This introductory course in composition prepares students for the writing to be undertaken in their undergraduate coursework and provides an introduction to the rhetorical, conceptual and stylistic demands of writing at the university level including composing, researching, and utilizing sources. During the course students will practice and peer edit their personal, expository, analytical and persuasive research writing, paying attention to the elements that make for good writing in any genre.

 

Required Texts

They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writingby Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein


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ENG 100(7): Composition I

instructor:  Kelsey AmosMore
time:  MWF 9:30-10:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at kmt.amos@gmail.com

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ENG 100(8): Composition I

instructor:  Bryan KuwadaMore
time:  MWF 9:30-10:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at kuwada@hawaii.edu

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ENG 100(9): Composition I

instructor:  Aiko YamashiroMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at aikoy@hawaii.edu

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ENG 100(10): Composition I

instructor:  No‘u RevillaMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
focus:  FW
description: 
Aloha mai. Welcome to English 100. This is a place-based composition course that will prepare you for the demands of university-level writing.

As your instructor, I argue that place is foundational to identity, knowledge, and creativity, and will emphasize the role of place in our work. ‘Āina is that which feeds. As we cultivate writing habits, research techniques, and critical thinking skills, we will reflect on how place has fed us, physically, intellectually, and culturally.

We will begin the semester with a brief but valuable narrative of your different relationships to place. Indeed, the knowledge each of us brings to the classroom has been shaped in many ways by the places where we have lived, worked, created, suffered loss, changed our minds, took risks, and evolved. Our first major assignment asks you to explore these connections in critical and creative ways. Subsequently, an interview project will open your story to incorporate another layer of experience and knowledge.

You will also produce a comparative image analysis of advertising images that attempt to “sell” Hawai‘i. We will critically discuss issues of representation.

Lastly, the research project on tourism will build on your narrative and analytical skills while introducing you to the demands of research, collaborative work, and an oral presentation. Throughout the semester, we will identify and refine our literacy practices as well as challenge our assumptions about place and knowledge.

In this active learning environment, passionate discussions will occur. Our classroom is a safe and supportive space, and we must all be respectful of each other. Remember, we are not only developing as writers but also as critical thinkers.  So while we may disagree, it is important that we listen to each other and exchange ideas in considerate ways.


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ENG 100(11): Composition I

instructor:  Bryan KuwadaMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at kuwada@hawaii.edu

Print

ENG 100(12): Composition I

instructor:  Jacquelyn ChappelMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
focus:  FW
description: 

This introductory course in composition prepares students for the writing to be undertaken in their undergraduate coursework and provides an introduction to the rhetorical, conceptual and stylistic demands of writing at the university level including composing, researching, and utilizing sources. During the course students will practice and peer edit their personal, expository, analytical and persuasive research writing, paying attention to the elements that make for good writing in any genre.

 

Required Texts

·       They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writingby Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein

 


Print

ENG 100(13): Composition I

instructor:  Kelsey AmosMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at kmt.amos@gmail.com

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ENG 100(14): Composition I

instructor:  Donovan Colleps
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at donovankc.is@gmail.com

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ENG 100(16): Composition I

instructor:  Eve YoungdaleMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
focus:  FW
description: 
One of the most useful skills developed in college should be your ability to communicate written information effectively.  Thus, in English 100, we will spend significant time concentrating on the process of how to write now, so you will be able to focus more of your time on what your are writing in future work. This course is designed to develop your college writing and critical thinking skills, and in it you will often focus on writing about topics of your own choosing. Thus, you should be interested in what you are researching and writing and should concentrate on topics which will enrich your life and understanding.

 

We will spend a large portion of our time together writing and revising. Writing is a process, and focusing on the individual steps of that process, such as brainstorming, creating a rough draft, editing, peer review, and revising to the final draft, is a significant key to creating a successful paper. This semester you will draft, and eventually revise, four essays, each using a different approach. Approaches include a personal narrative essay, a rhetorical analysis of a documentary film, an op-ed argument essay, and a research essay with citations. We will also be frequently writing smaller pieces such as journal entries and other assignments geared toward the process of writing. Class will be both discussion and lecture based, thus students should expect to think on, write and talk about their writing every day. We will benefit from the wide variety of topics and ideas that each person brings to class and create an interesting and rich environment in which to gain greater confidence in writing.

 

Course Requirements:

  • Regular attendance and active participation
  • A total of four papers of varying lengths, adding up to twenty pages of edited and revised prose.
  • Journal entries designed to help you along the writing process as needed
  • A class portfolio and reflection letter at the end of the semester
  • Other informal writing assignments, activities, and worksheets as assigned
  • Four informal class presentations on your essays

 

Required Texts (Both available at the UH Bookstore):

 

Ballenger, Bruce. The Curious Writer: The Brief Edition, 4th Edition. Boston: Longman,   2012.

 

Hacker, Diana, and Nancy Sommers. A Pocket Style Guide, 6th Edition. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2012.


Print

ENG 100(17): Composition I

instructor:  Edward LeeMore
time:  11:30-12:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at edwardhl@hawaii.edu

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ENG 100(18): Composition I

instructor:  Jamaica Osorio
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
focus:  FW
description: 

This is a place based English 100 course. Our course materials and conversations will be based and informed by the places we represent as individuals and the environment that surrounds us as students at the University of Hawaiʻi (Hawaiʻi). The ultimate goal of the course is to help students develop critical thinking, reasoning, and effective writing skills through the lens of understanding the relationship between writing/ academic discourse and place.

Required Text

All required texts will be made available through Laulima.

Assignments 

Weekly assignments will include reading, and written responses.

There will be 4 major assignments.

  • Ola ka Inoa
    • Personal narrative discussing your name (given name, last name, nickname): where it comes from, what it means, its significance…
  • He ali'i ka 'aina; he kauwa ke kanaka: Wahi Pana Project
    • Experiential / research based essay on a site in Hawaiʻi
  • Compare and Contrast image analysis
  • ʻImi Naʻauao: Research paper
    • Scholarly based research project/ paper on the topic of your choice

For more information please contact the instructor.


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ENG 100(19): Composition I

instructor:  Thuy Da LamMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
focus:  FW
description: 

“Write, Read, Rewrite. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as Needed”—Susan Sontag’s directions for writing—will be a motto for our class, in which we will approach reading and writing as interrelated processes. Learning to write well begins with close reading. We will read short essays on relevant issues, not only for content but also for form, as possible models for our writing. We will analyze how successful writers use various rhetorical strategies to convey meaning. The essay assignments will give you practice in using a range of strategies to achieve specific purposes—to reflect, to inform, to analyze, and to persuade. You will learn how to draw on your readings as relevant and reliable sources to be integrated into your writing, following the MLA style guide. We will work on planning, drafting, and revising, with an emphasis on rewriting in order to produce clear and concise prose. We will also focus on issues of style, grammar, and mechanics that are specific to your writing. Essential to this course are our one-on-one conferences to discuss and guide your composition. 

 

Required Texts

 

·      Course Reader: ENG 100. Available at Marketing and Publication Services, on the campus of the University Laboratory School, UHM College of Education, 956-4969.

 

·      A Pocket Style Manual. 6th ed. Available at UHM Bookstore, Campus Center.


Print

ENG 100(20): Composition I

instructor:  Amanda Adams-HandyMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
focus:  FW
description: 

Writing makes a difference.

Everyday we write. Whether we write a new status update for our Facebook accounts, compose a quick email to a friend, think up a few new song lyrics while singing in the shower and then jot them down later, or write an essay for a school assignment, we all write. In this class, I want us all to see that writing is a task that we continually use to make meaning of our world and to communicate those newly-made meanings to others.  Connecting writings’ important purpose with the acts of reading and writing that make up our daily lives and with our own actions for social change, I, ultimately, want us to see within this class that writing makes a tremendous difference.

 

Course Objectives:

1). To continually develop and refine writing skills by practicing with various written forms, including creative journal entries, blogs, journalism articles, personal narratives, poems, and song lyrics. 

2). To become skilled in crafting the organization, content, and mechanics of the critical analysis and research essay forms.

3). To cultivate close, careful reading skills through the analysis and discussion of various texts including news articles, blogs, photographs, memoirs, short stories, poems, song lyrics, short video clips and ads, essays, and the novel.

 

Assignments:

There are 4 major writing assignments including a personal narrative, an exploratory essay, a critical analysis paper, and a final research paper. You will also be required to complete a Social Action Project and several short writing responses both inside and outside of class. All of the assignments can be revised within this course, and included in the final portfolio for a higher grade. The aim of this course is to focus on the progression of writing and the final grade is based on that progression.

 

Course Texts & Supplies:

1). English 100 Course Reader

(available for purchase at Professional Image Printing)

2). Composition Notebook for journal assignments

3). Notebook and Pencil for taking notes in class


Print

ENG 100(21): Composition I

instructor:  Karyl ReynoldsMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
focus:  FW
description: 
In this section of English 100, students will learn tricks and tips for writing with clarity, artistry, and strength. You will be invited, through reading and writing assignments, to be increasingly mindful of the audience and to develop the most effective delivery method for any message you wish to share with your readers. Through practice with sentence revisions, you will learn how write with precision and to edit and revise anything you compose with an eye for perfection. Through workshops both in class and in Hamilton Library, students will learn how to effectively locate credible and scholarly resources, how to incorporate the words and ideas of the experts into your own writings, and how to cite your sources accurately following Modern Language Association (MLA) formatting. You will be asked to create time for writing that will be sufficient for composing written pieces that are thoughtful, clear, and well revised. Students will also be asked to reflect on the process they go through as they write and to learn, through these reflections, about themselves and how they think.

 

Course Text:

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy Birkenstein. “They Say/I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing (with Readings). 2nd Edition. New York, W.W. Norton, 2012.


Print

ENG 100(22): Composition I

instructor:  Thuy Da LamMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
focus:  FW
description: 

“Write, Read, Rewrite. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as Needed”—Susan Sontag’s directions for writing—will be a motto for our class, in which we will approach reading and writing as interrelated processes. Learning to write well begins with close reading. We will read short essays on relevant issues, not only for content but also for form, as possible models for our writing. We will analyze how successful writers use various rhetorical strategies to convey meaning. The essay assignments will give you practice in using a range of strategies to achieve specific purposes—to reflect, to inform, to analyze, and to persuade. You will learn how to draw on your readings as relevant and reliable sources to be integrated into your writing, following the MLA style guide. We will work on planning, drafting, and revising, with an emphasis on rewriting in order to produce clear and concise prose. We will also focus on issues of style, grammar, and mechanics that are specific to your writing. Essential to this course are our one-on-one conferences to discuss and guide your composition. 

 

Required Texts

 

·      Course Reader: ENG 100. Available at Marketing and Publication Services, on the campus of the University Laboratory School, UHM College of Education, 956-4969.

 

·      A Pocket Style Manual. 6th ed. Available at UHM Bookstore, Campus Center.


Print

ENG 100(23): Composition I

instructor:  Edward LeeMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at edwardhl@hawaii.edu

Print

ENG 100(24): Composition I

instructor:  Karyl ReynoldsMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
focus:  FW
description: 
In this section of English 100, students will learn tricks and tips for writing with clarity, artistry, and strength. You will be invited, through reading and writing assignments, to be increasingly mindful of the audience and to develop the most effective delivery method for any message you wish to share with your readers. Through practice with sentence revisions, you will learn how write with precision and to edit and revise anything you compose with an eye for perfection. Through workshops both in class and in Hamilton Library, students will learn how to effectively locate credible and scholarly resources, how to incorporate the words and ideas of the experts into your own writings, and how to cite your sources accurately following Modern Language Association (MLA) formatting. You will be asked to create time for writing that will be sufficient for composing written pieces that are thoughtful, clear, and well revised. Students will also be asked to reflect on the process they go through as they write and to learn, through these reflections, about themselves and how they think.

 

Course Text:

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy Birkenstein. “They Say/I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing (with Readings). 2nd Edition. New York, W.W. Norton, 2012.


Print

ENG 100(25): Composition I

instructor:  Eve YoungdaleMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
focus:  FW
description: 
One of the most useful skills developed in college should be your ability to communicate written information effectively.  Thus, in English 100, we will spend significant time concentrating on the process of how to write now, so you will be able to focus more of your time on what your are writing in future work. This course is designed to develop your college writing and critical thinking skills, and in it you will often focus on writing about topics of your own choosing. Thus, you should be interested in what you are researching and writing and should concentrate on topics which will enrich your life and understanding.

We will spend a large portion of our time together writing and revising. Writing is a process, and focusing on the individual steps of that process, such as brainstorming, creating a rough draft, editing, peer review, and revising to the final draft, is a significant key to creating a successful paper. This semester you will draft, and eventually revise, four essays, each using a different approach. Approaches include a personal narrative essay, a rhetorical analysis of a documentary film, an op-ed argument essay, and a research essay with citations. We will also be frequently writing smaller pieces such as journal entries and other assignments geared toward the process of writing. Class will be both discussion and lecture based, thus students should expect to think on, write and talk about their writing every day. We will benefit from the wide variety of topics and ideas that each person brings to class and create an interesting and rich environment in which to gain greater confidence in writing.

Course Requirements:

  • Regular attendance and active participation
  • A total of four papers of varying lengths, adding up to twenty pages of edited and revised prose.
  • Journal entries designed to help you along the writing process as needed
  • A class portfolio and reflection letter at the end of the semester
  • Other informal writing assignments, activities, and worksheets as assigned
  • Four informal class presentations on your essays

Required Texts (Both available at the UH Bookstore):

Ballenger, Bruce. The Curious Writer: The Brief Edition, 4th Edition. Boston: Longman,   2012.

Hacker, Diana, and Nancy Sommers. A Pocket Style Guide, 6th Edition. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2012.


Print

ENG 100(26): Composition I

instructor:  Edward LeeMore
time:  MWF 2:30-3:20
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at edwardhl@hawaii.edu

Print

ENG 100(27): Composition I

instructor:  Amanda Adams-HandyMore
time:  MWF 2:30-3:20
focus:  FW
description: 

Writing makes a difference.

Everyday we write. Whether we write a new status update for our Facebook accounts, compose a quick email to a friend, think up a few new song lyrics while singing in the shower and then jot them down later, or write an essay for a school assignment, we all write. In this class, I want us all to see that writing is a task that we continually use to make meaning of our world and to communicate those newly-made meanings to others.  Connecting writings’ important purpose with the acts of reading and writing that make up our daily lives and with our own actions for social change, I, ultimately, want us to see within this class that writing makes a tremendous difference.

 

Course Objectives:

1). To continually develop and refine writing skills by practicing with various written forms, including creative journal entries, blogs, journalism articles, personal narratives, poems, and song lyrics. 

2). To become skilled in crafting the organization, content, and mechanics of the critical analysis and research essay forms.

3). To cultivate close, careful reading skills through the analysis and discussion of various texts including news articles, blogs, photographs, memoirs, short stories, poems, song lyrics, short video clips and ads, essays, and the novel.

 

Assignments:

There are 4 major writing assignments including a personal narrative, an exploratory essay, a critical analysis paper, and a final research paper. You will also be required to complete a Social Action Project and several short writing responses both inside and outside of class. All of the assignments can be revised within this course, and included in the final portfolio for a higher grade. The aim of this course is to focus on the progression of writing and the final grade is based on that progression.

 

Course Texts & Supplies:

1). English 100 Course Reader

(available for purchase at Professional Image Printing)

2). Composition Notebook for journal assignments

3). Notebook and Pencil for taking notes in class


Print

ENG 100(28): Composition I

instructor:  Eve YoungdaleMore
time:  MWF 2:30-3:20
focus:  FW
description: 
One of the most useful skills developed in college should be your ability to communicate written information effectively.  Thus, in English 100, we will spend significant time concentrating on the process of how to write now, so you will be able to focus more of your time on what your are writing in future work. This course is designed to develop your college writing and critical thinking skills, and in it you will often focus on writing about topics of your own choosing. Thus, you should be interested in what you are researching and writing and should concentrate on topics which will enrich your life and understanding.

We will spend a large portion of our time together writing and revising. Writing is a process, and focusing on the individual steps of that process, such as brainstorming, creating a rough draft, editing, peer review, and revising to the final draft, is a significant key to creating a successful paper. This semester you will draft, and eventually revise, four essays, each using a different approach. Approaches include a personal narrative essay, a rhetorical analysis of a documentary film, an op-ed argument essay, and a research essay with citations. We will also be frequently writing smaller pieces such as journal entries and other assignments geared toward the process of writing. Class will be both discussion and lecture based, thus students should expect to think on, write and talk about their writing every day. We will benefit from the wide variety of topics and ideas that each person brings to class and create an interesting and rich environment in which to gain greater confidence in writing.

Course Requirements:

  • Regular attendance and active participation
  • A total of four papers of varying lengths, adding up to twenty pages of edited and revised prose.
  • Journal entries designed to help you along the writing process as needed
  • A class portfolio and reflection letter at the end of the semester
  • Other informal writing assignments, activities, and worksheets as assigned
  • Four informal class presentations on your essays

Required Texts (Both available at the UH Bookstore):

Ballenger, Bruce. The Curious Writer: The Brief Edition, 4th Edition. Boston: Longman,   2012.

Hacker, Diana, and Nancy Sommers. A Pocket Style Guide, 6th Edition. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2012.


Print

ENG 100(29): Composition I

instructor:  Nani RossMore
time:  TR 7:30-8:45
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at kaiolohia@hawaii.rr.com

Print

ENG 100(31): Composition I

instructor:  Rajiv Mohabir
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
focus:  FW
description: 
In this composition course the primary focus will be on engaging with the environments around us as writers and in doing so to refine your writing skills through the course’s various writing assignments. We will begin with narrative writing and end the semester with a research project of your own design.

You will have the opportunity to think and write creatively through our discussions of place. The idea for this class is that writing is a process. We will highlight this process by focusing on brainstorming, writing rough drafts, editing, participating in peer review, and revising final drafts.

The goal of this class is to prepare you for academic writing, allowing you to participate in discussion at the university level by honing your close reading, critical thinking, and rhetorical analysis skills.


Print

ENG 100(33): Composition I

instructor:  Kristine E. KoteckiMore
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
focus:  FW
description: 
In this composition course, you will learn how to actively understand and actively respond to current issues. You will read, discuss and write about controversies surrounding television, technology use, and video games. You will also pick one of these controversies to more thoroughly research and respond to through oral and written argument.

 

This “Foundations: Written Communication General Education requirement” course will prepare you to do the following:           

  • Compose college-level writing, including but not limited to academic discourse, that achieves a specific purpose and responds adeptly to an identifiable audience.
  • Effectively generate, revise, edit, and proofread essays in order to produce finished prose.
  • Compose an argument that makes use of source material that is relevant and credible and that is integrated in accordance with the MLA style guide.

 

Required Texts

  • Osbourne, Jeff. Reading Pop Culture. Boston: Bedford/St Martins, 2013. ISBN-13: 9781457606021
  • Lunsford, Andrea A., John J. Ruszkiewicz, and Keith Walters. Everything's an Argument, 6th edition. Bedford/St Martins, 2013. ISBN-13: 9781457606069

 

Grading Basis

  • 50%    Five short papers (11 pages)
  • 20%    Literature review and synthesis (5 pages)
  • 10%    Blog portfolio (4 pages)
  • 10%    Oral Presentations (reading response and group presentation)
  • 10%    Exercise central scorecard

ENG 100(34): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
focus:  FW

Print

ENG 100(35): Composition I

instructor:  Nani RossMore
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at kaiolohia@hawaii.rr.com

Print

ENG 100(36): Composition I

instructor:  Anjoli RoyMore
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
focus:  FW
description: 
In this course, we will discuss and practice reading and writing strategies that will help prepare you for your coursework and research during your future years at UH. We will emphasize analysis by
  • figuring out how texts work
  • carefully considering historical-social-political contexts of writing
  • identifying strategies writers use for different audiences and purposes
  • questioning what may be assumed by or left out of a text
  • thinking about the ethical dimensions of writing and research.

We will be talking and writing about complex social issues that are important both globally and in Hawai‘i, including politics of place and migration, gender identity, sexuality, and the industrialization of food. We will approach these topics from the standpoint of community health and will also devote a substantial part of the semester thinking about solutions within the context of social justice.

We will also be thinking about the other kinds of knowledge and expertise we each bring to this class, and you will be encouraged to interweave personal stories, interviews, and oral sources into your writing assignments. Our readings and discussion will range from scholarly articles to Facebook, poetry to news articles, and literature to photographs.

Formal writing assignments will include description, comparison, argument, analysis, and research, and will encourage you to write critically and creatively. We will also be practicing strategies for revising, editing, proofreading. You will be required to do a total of twenty polished pages of writing divided throughout the semester. Other assignments include group presentations, reading responses, and quizzes. Class participation in the form of active discussion will be required.

 

Required Texts

All readings will be supplied to you via Laulima

 

Assignments

  • 10%: Geobiography
  • 10%: Response papers (several)
  • 10%: Gender essay
  • 15%: Interview
  • 20%: Research Essay
  • 5%: Letter
  • 5%: Writing Skills Quizzes
  • 5%: Presentation
  • 20%: Class participation

Print

ENG 100(37): Composition I

instructor:  Maile GreshamMore
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at mgresham@hawaii.edu

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ENG 100(38): Composition I

instructor:  Julia Wieting
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
focus:  FW
description: 
Writing can take you boldly where you've never gone before, but only if you're willing to make the journey.  In this course we will contextualize college writing within an investigation into how writing is a means of expressing knowledge and the limits of knowledge.  Course work will focus specifically on critical reading as the foundation of critical writing, the importance of becoming an editor as well as a creator, and the various expectations and assumptions that underlie academic writing (as opposed to other genres of writing).  Students will learn to assess their own writing development, and class time will often be spent on collaborative, investigative learning.  The course readings will be centered in science fiction and science non-fiction as genres that encourage reflection about what we know and how we know it. 

Course Requirements

  • Attendance and participation
  • Weekly reading response assignments (total of 10 over the course of the semester)
  • Three essays (totaling 15 pages)
  • Peer-editing/workshopping
  • Final paper (5-6 pages)
  • A sense of adventure

Required Texts

  • Course reader (available from UH's Marketing and Publication Services, 1776 University Avenue, CMA 101, 808-956-4969 [behind the University Lab School])

Print

ENG 100(39): Composition I

instructor:  Nadia InserraMore
time:  TR 12:00-1:15
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at inserra@hawaii.edu

ENG 100(41): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
focus:  FW

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ENG 100(42): Composition I

instructor:  Julia Wieting
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
focus:  FW
description: 

Writing can take you boldly where you've never gone before, but only if you're willing to make the journey.  In this course we will contextualize college writing within an investigation into how writing is a means of expressing knowledge and the limits of knowledge.  Course work will focus specifically on critical reading as the foundation of critical writing, the importance of becoming an editor as well as a creator, and the various expectations and assumptions that underlie academic writing (as opposed to other genres of writing).  Students will learn to assess their own writing development, and class time will often be spent on collaborative, investigative learning.  The course readings will be centered in science fiction and science non-fiction as genres that encourage reflection about what we know and how we know it.

Course Requirements

  • Attendance and participation
  • Weekly reading response assignments (total of 10 over the course of the semester)
  • Three essays (totaling 15 pages)
  • Peer-editing/workshopping
  • Final paper (5-6 pages)
  • A sense of adventure

Required Texts 

  • Course reader (available from UH's Marketing and Publication Services, 1776 University Avenue, CMA 101, 808-956-4969 [behind the University Lab School])

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ENG 100A(1): Composition I Honors

instructor:  Jonathan MorseMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
focus:  FW
description: 

Freshman composition was invented by a Harvard professor named Barrett Wendell more than a hundred years ago, and in all the years since then its purpose and practice have been the same: to drag some 18-year-olds still wearing high school clothes into a classroom, sit them down hard on uncomfortable furniture, and make them start learning to read and write like grownups. That’s what we’ll be doing in this honors section, too, but with one difference: a lot of our reading and writing will be aboutreading and writing, both the kind with footnotes accumulated in the library and the kind without. And you’ll see: come to class, do what I say, and by December you’ll probably be reading and writing better than you do now.

 

There will be no exams except for a practice run toward the end of the semester, when we’ll be getting ready for sophomore literature, but you’ll be turning in a piece of writing just about every week: minimum length two double-spaced pages (about 500 words), maximum length five pages. Not counting in-class exercises or the exam, you’ll write about 25 pages over the course of the semester.

 

Required Texts, at the University bookstore

 

·      The Little Seagull Handbook, second edition

·      English 100A, a custom reader compiled for this section


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ENG 100A(2): Composition I Honors

instructor:  Maile GreshamMore
time:  TR 12:00-1:15
focus:  FW
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at mgresham@hawaii.edu

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ENG 190(1): Composition I Transfers

instructor:  Jacquelyn ChappelMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
focus:  FW
description: 

This introductory course in composition prepares transfer students for the writing to be undertaken in their undergraduate coursework and provides an introduction to the rhetorical, conceptual and stylistic demands of writing at the university level including composing, researching, and utilizing sources. During the course students will practice and peer edit their personal, expository, analytical and persuasive research writing, paying attention to the elements that make for good writing in any genre.

Required Texts

  • They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writingby Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein