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Spring Semester 2015

The following descriptions of individual courses and sections supplement the general catalog descriptions. For the complete registration listings with CRNs and prerequisites, see the official schedule.

ENG 100ENG 200ENG 270-273ENG 300ENG 400Graduate  

Composition I and Honors Program

  • ENGLISH 100: Composition I
  • ENGLISH 100A: Honors Program. Contact the Honors Office at 956-8391 for information.
  • ENGLISH 190: Composition I for Transfer Students to UH Manoa

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ENG 100(1): Composition I

instructor:  Eric San GeorgeMore
time:  MWF 7:30-8:20
description: 
This course is designed to introduce you to the demands of academic writing. You will learn how to evaluate sources, conduct and document original research, organize a paper around a clear and concise thesis, and identify rhetorical strategies that writers use to address and inform their audiences. Throughout the semester, you will review grammar, usage, mechanics, and punctuation in order to add clarity and authority to your writing. You will learn and improve these skills, in part, by working collaboratively with your peers on a number of informal and formal writing assignments and presentations. 

 

Assignments include presenting on an aspect of English grammar, composing formal essays, developing a research project, proofreading peers’ papers, and discussing a range of readings in groups. You will submit drafts for each major writing assignment, and you will have the opportunity to rewrite or revise your papers after they have been graded and returned to you.

 

Required Texts

 

·      Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein, They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. 3rd ed.

·      Diana Hacker and Nancy Sommers, A Pocket Style Manual. 6th ed.


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ENG 100(4): Composition I

instructor:  Janet GrahamMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
description: 
How do you know what you know? How is academic knowledge created? Using such questions as the basis for formulating knowledge, we begin our work developing your ability to comprehend academic discourse, write academic arguments, and approach research as a form of personal and academic inquiry.

 

In this course, you will be introduced to the rhetorical, conceptual, and stylistic demands of writing at the college level and instructed in composing processes, search strategies, and composing from sources. This course will also provide you with experiences in the library and on the Internet and enhance your skills in accessing and using various types of primary and secondary materials.

 

Course Requirements

 

Class Participation and Preparation

 

You will write informally in class; analyze short texts for rhetorical, theoretical, and linguistic features; discuss what you read and write; listen to and show respect for everyone in our learning community; and use relevant feedback with the goal of improving all aspects of your written work.

 

Assessed Writing

 

You will write four formal pieces of polished prose including a rhetorical analysis, a community-based problem-solution essay, a causal argument essay, and a research essay. As you gain proficiency in selecting sources and using and citing them appropriately, you will be expected to incorporate a greater number and variety of academic sources into your work. You may resubmit the first three papers for a higher score provided the quality of the piece is sufficiently improved and the rewrite is completed and submitted within a reasonable time frame.

 

Required Texts

 

All required texts will be made available through Laulima.


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ENG 100(5): Composition I

instructor:  Edward LeeMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
description: 
This course is designed to help you develop your critical thinking and writing skills. Throughout the course of the semester, you will be asked to write online, at home, and in the classroom in addition to completing and discussing reading assignments. As a class, we will go over notions of utilizing writing to think and learn, and we will also think about writing for different audiences. Because writing is a process, revisions of papers will be assisted by your classmates as peer reviewers, by the class mentor, and by me in conferences.

 

Final grades will be determined by the successful completion of written assignments (4-5 essays (including a research project) and a separate portfolio), attendance, and class participation.

 

Reading assignments will be available for you to download from our class website.


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ENG 100(6): Composition I

instructor:  Eve YoungdaleMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
description: 
One of the most useful skills developed in college should be your ability to communicate written information effectively.  Thus, in English 100, we will spend significant time concentrating on the process of how to write now, so you will be able to focus more of your time on what your are writing in future work. This course is designed to develop your college writing and critical thinking skills, and in it you will often focus on writing about topics of your own choosing. Thus, you should be interested in what you are researching and writing and should concentrate on topics which will enrich your life and understanding.

 

We will spend a large portion of our time together writing and revising. Writing is a process, and focusing on the individual steps of that process, such as brainstorming, creating a rough draft, editing, peer review, and revising to the final draft, is a significant key to creating a successful paper. This semester you will draft, and eventually revise, four essays, each using a different approach. Approaches include a personal narrative essay, a rhetorical analysis of a documentary film, an op-ed argument essay, and a research essay with citations. We will also be frequently writing smaller pieces such as journal entries and other assignments geared toward the process of writing. Class will be both discussion and lecture based, thus students should expect to think on, write and talk about their writing every day. We will benefit from the wide variety of topics and ideas that each person brings to class and create an interesting and rich environment in which to gain greater confidence in writing.

 

Required Texts:

Ballenger, Bruce. The Curious Writer: The Brief Edition, 4th Edition. Boston: Longman, 2013.


Hacker, Diana, and Nancy I. Sommers. A Pocket Style Manual. 6th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2011.


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ENG 100(7): Environmental Arguments

instructor:  Rebecca EvansMore
time:  MWF 9:30-10:20
description: 
Environmental Arguments

How do you relate to your environment? What effects might climate change have on Hawai‘i? What sustainability policies should your university adopt? As society works to respond to environmental crises, all of these questions are increasingly important to your future, but providing a persuasive answer for any of them isn’t easy. You have to know how to familiarize yourself with public debates, how to put forward a clear thesis, how to find useful sources to support that thesis, and how to organize your claims and evidence–in other words, how to construct an academic argument.

 

In this class, you’ll learn the ins and outs of communicating at the college level. You’ll read other people’s arguments, respond with your own, and revise your work to better convey your ideas. We’ll focus in particular on contemporary debates about sustainability, considering scientific, political, philosophical, and cultural sources. By the end of the semester, you’ll not only have mastered the foundations of academic reading, research, and written and verbal communication; you’ll also find yourself able to confidently enter environmental debates at the University of Hawai‘i and beyond.

 

Texts

Gerald and Cathy Birkenstein, They Say, I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, Third Edition. ISBN: 978-0393935844

 

All other readings will be made available on Laulima. Films and/or TV episodes will be posted online or placed on library reserve, and may be screened in advance depending on student interest.

 

Assignments

In a series of short papers, you’ll practice responding to texts, investigating issues, and making persuasive arguments. The final paper will require you research a topic of your choosing related to Hawaiian environmentalism and will include a brief in-class presentation. We’ll work up to each paper with short, low-stakes assignments, and you’ll workshop drafts before turning in revised final drafts.


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ENG 100(8): Composition I

instructor:  Linda MiddletonMore
time:  MWF 9:30-10:20
description:  TBA.

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ENG 100(9): Composition I

instructor:  Janet GrahamMore
time:  MWF 9:30-10:20
description: 
How do you know what you know? How is academic knowledge created? Using such questions as the basis for formulating knowledge, we begin our work developing your ability to comprehend academic discourse, write academic arguments, and approach research as a form of personal and academic inquiry.

 

In this course, you will be introduced to the rhetorical, conceptual, and stylistic demands of writing at the college level and instructed in composing processes, search strategies, and composing from sources. This course will also provide you with experiences in the library and on the Internet and enhance your skills in accessing and using various types of primary and secondary materials.

 

Course Requirements

 

Class Participation and Preparation

 

You will write informally in class; analyze short texts for rhetorical, theoretical, and linguistic features; discuss what you read and write; listen to and show respect for everyone in our learning community; and use relevant feedback with the goal of improving all aspects of your written work.

 

Assessed Writing

 

You will write four formal pieces of polished prose including a rhetorical analysis, a community-based problem-solution essay, a causal argument essay, and a research essay. As you gain proficiency in selecting sources and using and citing them appropriately, you will be expected to incorporate a greater number and variety of academic sources into your work. You may resubmit the first three papers for a higher score provided the quality of the piece is sufficiently improved and the rewrite is completed and submitted within a reasonable time frame.

 

Required Texts

 

All required texts will be made available through Laulima.


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ENG 100(11): Composition I

instructor:  Anjoli RoyMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
description: 
In this course, we will discuss and practice reading and writing strategies that will help prepare you for your coursework and research during your future years at UH. We will emphasize analysis by

§  figuring out how texts work

§  carefully considering historical, social, and political contexts of writing

§  identifying strategies writers use for different audiences and purposes

§  questioning what may be assumed by or left out of a text

§  thinking about the ethical dimensions of writing and research.

We will be talking and writing about complex social issues that are important both globally and in Hawai‘i, including politics of place and migration, gender, sexuality, and the industrialization of food. We will approach these topics from the standpoint of community health and will also devote a substantial part of the semester thinking about solutions within the context of social justice.

We will also be thinking about the other kinds of knowledge and expertise we each bring to this class, and you will be encouraged to interweave personal stories, interviews, and oral sources into your writing assignments. Our readings and discussion will range from scholarly articles to Facebook to news articles to literature.

Formal writing assignments will include description, comparison, argument, analysis, and research, and will encourage you to write critically and creatively. We will also be practicing strategies for revising, editing, proofreading. You will be required to do a total of twenty polished pages of writing divided throughout the semester. Other assignments include group presentations, reading responses, and quizzes. Class participation in the form of active discussion will be required.

Required Materials

    Handouts/printouts of readings

    Notebook for taking notes and for in-class writing assignments

Assignments

§  Geobiography (3 pages): 10%

§  Response Papers (5 to 10 pages): 15%

o   Summary and response papers (1-2 page each)

o   Quote and response papers (1-2 pages each)

§  Gender Essay (3 to 4 pages): 10%

§  Interview (5 pages): 15%

§  Research Essay  (4-5 pages): 20%

§  Writing Skill Quizzes (3): 5%

§  Presentation: 5%

§  Class participation, including attendance, discussion, draft days, in-class writing, small writing assignments: 20%

Attendance

Attendance is mandatory for this discussion-based class.


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ENG 100(12): Composition I

instructor:  Anna FeuersteinMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
description: 
Rewriting America. What is America?  Many think this is an easy question that we can answer by core concepts that have become dominant in American culture and society.  America is the land of freedom, individual opportunity, equality (between different sexes, races, ethnicities, abilities, and sexual orientations), and liberty.  Or is it?  Where have these concepts come from, and what do they really mean?  Should they be taken as natural facts, or are they rather social conventions that cloud some of the more pressing problems facing us today?  What mythologies do we tell ourselves about America and what are the consequences?  This class will challenge the cultural myths and conventional assumptions that structure American culture and society, while examining, interrogating, and researching important current events.  Through course readings, class discussions, research, and writing assignments, students will think and write about a complex topic in a variety of ways, all in an effort to learn how to write well at the college level.

 

In this class students will be introduced to the rhetorical, conceptual, and stylistic demands of writing at the college level.  This class guides students through the writing process, search strategies, and how to incorporate secondary sources into their own writing.  Students will gain experience in the library and on the Internet to enhance their skills in accessing and using various types of primary and secondary materials.  Students will learn how to read critically and make use of a variety of sources in expressing their own opinions, ideas, and perspectives in writing.  Assignments include four longer writing assignments, numerous short writing assignments, peer review, and revisions.

 

Required Texts:

Gary Colombo, Robert Cullen and Bonnie Lisle, Rereading America, 9th edition

 

Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein, They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd edition

 

Richard Bullock and Francine Weinberg, The Little Seagull Handbook,2nd edition

 

 


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ENG 100(13): Composition I

instructor:  Nadia InserraMore
time:  MWF 10:30-11:20
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at inserra@hawaii.edu

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ENG 100(15): Environmental Arguments

instructor:  Rebecca EvansMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
description: 
Environmental Arguments

How do you relate to your environment? What effects might climate change have on Hawai‘i? What sustainability policies should your university adopt? As society works to respond to environmental crises, all of these questions are increasingly important to your future, but providing a persuasive answer for any of them isn’t easy. You have to know how to familiarize yourself with public debates, how to put forward a clear thesis, how to find useful sources to support that thesis, and how to organize your claims and evidence–in other words, how to construct an academic argument.

 

In this class, you’ll learn the ins and outs of communicating at the college level. You’ll read other people’s arguments, respond with your own, and revise your work to better convey your ideas. We’ll focus in particular on contemporary debates about sustainability, considering scientific, political, philosophical, and cultural sources. By the end of the semester, you’ll not only have mastered the foundations of academic reading, research, and written and verbal communication; you’ll also find yourself able to confidently enter environmental debates at the University of Hawai‘i and beyond.

 

Texts

Gerald and Cathy Birkenstein, They Say, I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, Third Edition. ISBN: 978-0393935844

 

All other readings will be made available on Laulima. Films and/or TV episodes will be posted online or placed on library reserve, and may be screened in advance depending on student interest.

 

Assignments

In a series of short papers, you’ll practice responding to texts, investigating issues, and making persuasive arguments. The final paper will require you research a topic of your choosing related to Hawaiian environmentalism and will include a brief in-class presentation. We’ll work up to each paper with short, low-stakes assignments, and you’ll workshop drafts before turning in revised final drafts.


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ENG 100(16): Composition I

instructor:  Edward LeeMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
description: 
This course is designed to help you develop your critical thinking and writing skills. Throughout the course of the semester, you will be asked to write online, at home, and in the classroom in addition to completing and discussing reading assignments. As a class, we will go over notions of utilizing writing to think and learn, and we will also think about writing for different audiences. Because writing is a process, revisions of papers will be assisted by your classmates as peer reviewers, by the class mentor, and by me in conferences.

 

Final grades will be determined by the successful completion of written assignments (4-5 essays (including a research project) and a separate portfolio), attendance, and class participation.

 

Reading assignments will be available for you to download from our class website.


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ENG 100(17): Composition I

instructor:  Theo GarneauMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
description: 
This course aims to be a comprehensive college-level composition course, offering students

   a varied and provocative reading and writing agenda;

   a thorough introduction to gr­ammatical, rhetorical, and stylistic basics of writing in a university community;

   a solid introduction to research using reliable sources from university libraries and the Internet;

   an opportunity to work regularly in groups with fellow students and in conference with the instructor;

   and a forum to share reactions and explore issues in an open and supportive atmosphere.

 

This is not a themecourse. Rather than exploring in depth one subject throughout the semester (gender construction, folklore, or sustainability, for instance), this course will offer an eclectic and hopefully engaging mix of readings on politics, race, society, commerce, language, sports, sexuality, drugs, music, and so on. We will also mix and match genres, analyzing speeches, memoirs, short stories, encomia and invective, business memos, and essays galore: expository, analytical, argumentative, some written by professors, some written by students. Perhaps the only constant will be the high quality of the writing. Each piece we read will offer unique lessons in style and clarity, subtlety and depth, construction, correctness, and persuasiveness.

 

In addition to our regular in-class work of writing in various modes (freewriting, directed writing, collaborative writing, brainstorming, summarizing readings and individual class sessions, etc.), students will submit twenty pages of polished prose (five three-page papers in various rhetorical modes and one five-page research paper); they will workshop each othersessays, give several group presentations, and take ten quizzes.

 

Regarding the three-page papers: I’m asking for five concise three-page essays (right to the bottom of page three, but not spilling onto page four). These are due at the beginning of the five classes specified below in the tentative schedule. There will be separate prompts for each essay, but all of your essays should incorporate the analyses of the readings that we will have done in class. I strongly suggest, therefore, that you take careful notes on our discussions. We will workshop these essays in order to refine our skills of attentive reading and listening, of giving and receiving feedback. You will turn in to me the improved draft in the next class session.

 

COURSE WORK

Final grades will be determined by the following criteria:

   Five three-page papers—drafts and rewrites (30%)

   One five-page documented research paper (20%)

   In-class participation: discussion groups, draft response/peer review groups (15%). Students who are absent for their groups work will lose 3% for each absence.

   Ten quizzes (25%). Quizzes are given at the beginning of the class; quizzes missed due to tardiness or unexcused absences cannot be made up. A grade of zero is given for missed quizzes.

   Collected in-class writings (10%)

 

 

REQUIRED TEXTS

Class readings are available on-line and free at our UH Laulima page under Resources > Class Readings. You are not obliged to print these texts, but if our classroom does not have computer terminals for each student, please bring an electronic device that allows you to access the text.

 

The Brief Penguin Handbook With Exercises (Includes 2009 MLA Updates) is an absolutely required text (available at the campus bookstore and online). This more than 600-page handbook offers chapters on grammar, mechanics, punctuation, style, and writing effective phrases, clauses, sentences, and paragraphs. Some chapters explore the basics of rhetoric, structuring essays, writing drafts, rewriting, and editing; other chapters treat the art of research: finding and evaluating sources, using sources responsibly, integrating them correctly into your prose, etc. There are also chapters on writing about literature, on writing about business. And finally, the handbook gives examples of submitted papers in various professional styles of documentation: the MLA, the APA, and the CMS. (We will cover as much of this material as we can in our short semester, but I will regularly encourage you to keep this text throughout your college career so that you may refer to it whenever you have questions about punctuation, usage, grammar, organization, and so on.) We will begin using the handbook the second week of classes, so get one immediately.


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ENG 100(18): Composition I

instructor:  Amanda ChristieMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
description: 
Writing and Doing

What do you like to write about? The answers to this question vary in detail but often boil down to what you like to do in everyday life. What we do and what we care enough to write about often directly relate to one another. In this class, the process of writing will be connected to tangible physical actions that take place inside and outside of the class. We will build things like robots and maps and diagrams as we talk about how a piece of writing is built and refined. We will walk through, observe, and take an active part in engaging with the communities around us as we connect what we do in everyday life with what we write. We will connect learning with doing and doing with writing in such a way, as to hopefully, make the words we put on the page this semester do something amazing!

 

Course Objectives:

1). To continually develop and refine writing skills by practicing with various written forms, including creative journal entries, blogs, journalism articles, personal narratives, poems, and song lyrics. 

2). To become skilled in crafting the organization, content, and mechanics of the critical analysis and research essay forms.

3). To cultivate close, careful reading skills through the analysis and discussion of various texts including news articles, blogs, photographs, memoirs, short stories, poems, song lyrics, short video clips and ads, essays, and the novel.

 

Assignments:

There are 5 major writing assignments including a problem-solution essay, an annotated bibliography, an exploratory essay, a critical analysis paper, and a final research paper. You will also be required several short (often interactive) writing responses both inside and outside of class. All of the major assignments can be revised within this course. The aim of this course is to focus on the progression of writing and the final grade is based on that progression.

 

Course Texts & Supplies:

1). English 100 Course Reader

(available for purchase at Professional Image Printing)

2). Composition Notebook for journal assignments

3). Notebook and Pencil for taking notes in class

 


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ENG 100(19): Composition I

instructor:  Thuy Da LamMore
time:  MWF 12:30-1:20
focus:  FW
description: 
“Write, Read, Rewrite. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 as Needed”—Susan Sontag’s directions for writing—will be a motto for our class, in which we will approach reading and writing as interrelated processes. Learning to write well begins with close reading. We will read short essays on relevant issues, not only for content but also for form, as possible models for our writing. We will analyze how successful writers use various rhetorical strategies to convey meaning. The essay assignments will give you practice in using a range of strategies to achieve specific purposes—to reflect, to inform, to analyze, and to persuade. You will learn how to draw on your readings as relevant and reliable sources to be integrated into your writing, following the MLA style guide. We will work on planning, drafting, and revising, with an emphasis on rewriting in order to produce clear and concise prose. We will also focus on issues of style, grammar, and mechanics that are specific to your writing. Essential to this course are our one-on-one conferences to discuss and guide your composition. 

 


Required Texts 

·      Course Reader: ENG 100. Available at Marketing and Publication Services, on the campus of the University Laboratory School, UHM College of Education, 956-4969.

 

·      A Pocket Style Manual. 6th ed. Available at UHM Bookstore, Campus Center.


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ENG 100(21): Composition I

instructor:  Kim CompocMore
time:  MWF 1:30-2:20
focus:  FW
description: 
Welcome to English 100! 

This class is designed to help you take charge of your writing so you can express yourself with clarity and precision. I believe we all have the potential to write beautiful and persuasive essays if given enough time to practice, get help, and revise. This class will give you ample opportunities to do so in a supportive and welcoming environment. I believe that by improving our research and writing skills, we deepen our engagement with the world at large. Even more, it can be fun!

A key task for English 100 is learning about rhetorical strategies and understanding your audience. I also emphasize thorough research, analytical reflection and creative expression. All readings will be posted online, and will include a wide range of topics from technical advice to current events.

We will have four main writing assignments. Additionally there will be a final essay, which will be a revision of a previous assignment. Students will also be graded on class participation, including posts on Laulima about the readings and each other’s work. Class time will also include: short lectures, peer review, small group work, quiet-time writing exercises, student presentations, large group discussion and library workshops.


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ENG 100(25): Composition I

instructor:  Karyl ReynoldsMore
time:  MWF 2:30-3:20
description: 
In this section of English 100, students will learn tricks and tips for writing with clarity, artistry, and strength. You will be invited, through reading and writing assignments, to be increasingly mindful of the audience and to develop the most effective delivery method for any message you wish to share with your readers. Through practice with sentence revisions, you will learn how write with precision and to edit and revise anything you compose with an eye for perfection. Through workshops both in class and in Hamilton Library, students will learn how to effectively locate credible and scholarly resources, how to incorporate the words and ideas of the experts into your own writings, and how to cite your sources accurately following Modern Language Association (MLA) formatting. You will be asked to create time for writing that will be sufficient for composing written pieces that are thoughtful, clear, and well revised. Students will also be asked to reflect on the process they go through as they write and to learn, through these reflections, about themselves and how they think.

 

Course Text:

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy Birkenstein. “They Say/I Say": The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing (with Readings). 2nd Edition. New York, W.W. Norton, 2012.


ENG 100(29): Composition I

instructor:  TBA
time:  TR 7:30-8:45

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ENG 100(30): Composition I

instructor:  Steven HolmesMore
time:  TR 9:00-10:15
focus:  FW
description: 
Aristotle defines rhetoric as the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion. This course will teach you to identify the rhetorical strategies available in select discursive genres.  In this course, you will utilize analytic and inductive reasoning, engage university resources, document evidence to support your reasoning, and hone your research methods.

A large part of this class will encourage you to actively participate in a research community. As such, as the class progresses, your research questions and your research interests will take part in shaping the class. To warm up to this, we will begin the class by focusing on different modules. In a module on autobiographical writing, we engage with the primary resource of When You Are Engulfed in Flamesby David Sedaris. In a module on sustainability on Oahu, we will read the novel The Islands at the End of the World. For the final, independent research project, we will read The Craft of Research.


The majority of the grade for this class will be based four major writing assignments.  This will include: a personal essay, an essay based on data you will conduct through personal interviews, an essay on sustainability on Oahu, and a final research paper on a topic you will develop with the class. Through these four assignments, you will complete the hallmarks of the written communication foundation. You will become familiar with composition methods, strategies for finding academic sources, and with the resources of the UH Manoa Library. Since a large part of research is based on reading comprehension, there will be some additional evaluative methods as well, including online postings to a course website hosted through Laulima.

Required Texts

The Craft of Research (3rd Edition)

When You Are Engulfed in Flames by David Sedaris

The Islands at the End of the World

A Course Reader


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ENG 100(33): Composition I

instructor:  Jacquelyn ChappelMore
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
focus:  FW
description: 
This introductory course in composition prepares students for the writing to be undertaken in their undergraduate coursework and provides an introduction to the rhetorical, conceptual and stylistic demands of writing at the university level including composing, researching, and utilizing sources. During the course students will practice and peer edit their personal, expository, analytical and persuasive research writing, paying attention to the elements that make for good writing in any genre.

Students in the course will be assessed on their:

·      Attendance and participation

·      Informal writing assignments

·      Peer editing/workshopping

·      Four formal essays


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ENG 100(34): Culture and Critical Analysis

instructor:  Melinda SmithMore
time:  TR 10:30-11:45
description: 
This course is designed to introduce you to a variety of cultural perspectives and to teach you how to critically analyze all the texts you read. Our course material will include literature, popular culture, and ethnographic texts, all chosen to help you think about issues of power, ideology, and difference within and between cultures. Although this is an English class, the texts and issues we will be dealing with are interdisciplinary, and you will be able to use the analytical skills gained in this class in other courses, as well as in your life in general.  In addition to learning how to analyze a variety of texts, you will also produce several types of writing (including a journal, informal writing pieces, and formal essays) to show you how each genre can be utilized to your benefit, both in and outside of academia. Upon completion of this course, you will be able to recognize and understand ideologies and biases inherent in texts, have the skills to analyze the details of texts to understand their messages, produce several forms of writing relevant to various situations, and understand the multiple roles writing can play in academic and regular life.  

 

 For more information, please contact the course instructor: Melinda Smith melinda4@hawaii.edu


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ENG 100(35): Composition I

instructor:  No‘u RevillaMore
time:  TR 12:00-1:15
description: 
         Aloha mai. Welcome to English 100. This is a place-based composition course that will prepare you for the demands of university-level writing.

         As your instructor, I argue that place is foundational to identity, knowledge, and creativity, and will emphasize the role of place in our work. ‘Āina is that which feeds. As we cultivate writing habits, research techniques, and critical thinking skills, we will reflect on how place has fed us, physically, intellectually, and culturally. 

         You will begin the semester with a brief but valuable narrative of home. Where do you consider home? Where have you cultivated a sense of belonging and trust? Indeed, the knowledge each of us brings to the classroom has been shaped in many ways by the places where we have lived, worked, created, suffered loss, changed our minds, and took risks. Our first major assignment asks you to explore these connections in a home narrative. Subsequently, an interview project will extend your narrative skills, and you will produce a profile on a classmate and his or her story about home. 

        Next, you will create a comparative image analysis of advertising images that attempt to “sell” Hawai‘i. We will critically discuss issues of representation.

         Lastly, the argumentative research project will build on your narrative and analytical skills while introducing you to the demands of research, and collaborative work. Throughout the semester, we will identify and refine our literacy practices as well as challenge our assumptions about place and knowledge.

     In this active learning environment, passionate discussions will occur. Our classroom is a safe and supportive space, and we must all be respectful of each other. Remember, we are not only developing as writers but also as critical thinkers.  So while we may disagree, it is important that we listen to each other and exchange ideas in considerate ways.


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ENG 100(36): Composition I

instructor:  Li-Anne DelaVegaMore
time:  TR 12:00-1:15
description: 
This course asks you to think of writing as a rhetorical act: What are you trying to say? Who is your audience? What is the best way to convey that message?  How is this an argument?

To bridge the gap between what you already know and what’s expected of you in college-level writing, we’ll critically look at the kinds of writing and reading you probably do everyday–Instagram posts, Youtube videos, Twitter tweets–to think about how audience, genre, and style work in academic writing.

We will continue to develop as writers by learning how talk about writing, trying out different forms of writing and writing processes, and engaging in different modes of learning. Our classroom and online space will be a workshop where we can explore writing as a multi-step process. We’ll brainstorm, map, outline, draft, review, and revise together to find the writing strategies that will help you get your message across clearly and concisely.

This class will be rigorous and highly collaborative, so expect to think a lot, write a lot, and talk a lot about writing.

Requirements:

There is no textbook requirement for this course. In lieu of a textbook, you are required to have the following items.

–A Wordpress account. This is where you’ll find all of our readings, announcements, and homework assignments.

–Post-It notes, highlighters, different color pens, and paper.

–Laptop, tablet, or smartphone, if possible.

Assignments:

–A Place-Based Personal Narrative

–A Visual Rhetorical Analysis

–A Community Report

–An Argumentative Research Paper

A 1-2 page meta-commentary that explains your writing process and intent must be turned in with each paper.


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ENG 100(38): Composition I

instructor:  Paul LyonsMore
time:  TR 1:30-2:45
description: 
This course aims to improve your writing skills--your ability to write nuanced, engaging sentences; to build effective paragraphs; to construct arguments; to engage various audiences; to integrate other people’s thoughts into your own. It encourages you to be more reflective, critical, and careful writers, through a series of exercises and formal assignments in expressive, expository, argumentative, and researched writing. While "skills"-oriented, the course will discuss several contemporary social/cultural/political issues (many related to Hawaii, to be found in the one required text for the course, The Value of Hawaii 2: Ancestral Roots, Oceanic Visions, ed. Aiko Yamashiro and Noelani Goodyear Ka‘ōpua), a collection of short essays, many of which pivot around the concept of good citizenship or good stewardship of land and resources. Additional essays, short stories, poems will be available on the course website on Laulima.


ASSIGNED WORK:

You will write six graded essays, five of them around three pages, and one a longer research paper of about ten pages. In addition to the graded papers, there will be short in-class writings or postings on Laulima or exercises for most class periods on pre-assigned topics (relating to short readings, topics, or assignments for the day).


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ENG 100A(1): Composition I Honors

instructor:  Anna FeuersteinMore
time:  MWF 11:30-12:20
description: 
Rewriting America.  What is America?  Many think this is an easy question that we can answer by core concepts that have become dominant in American culture and society.  America is the land of freedom, individual opportunity, equality (between different sexes, races, ethnicities, abilities, and sexual orientations), and liberty.  Or is it?  Where have these concepts come from, and what do they really mean?  Should they be taken as natural facts, or are they rather social conventions that cloud some of the more pressing problems facing us today?  What mythologies do we tell ourselves about America and what are the consequences?  This class will challenge the cultural myths and conventional assumptions that structure American culture and society, while examining, interrogating, and researching important current events.

 

As this is an honors course, students will be expected to deeply engage with a variety of college-level writing, write and revise extensively, and research a complex topic.  Formal assignments will include summary and response, compare and contrast, a research proposal, and a research paper.  Students will also do weekly short writing assignments in order to engage with the reading, work up to longer papers, and pre-write for the research paper.  Students will meet with me at least twice throughout the semester and will participate in peer review.  At the end of the semester students will present their research to the class, and put together a final portfolio including their revised papers and a critical analysis of their own writing.  We will spend a lot of time discussing argumentative writing, how to incorporate outside sources, and how to use the library. Through focusing on a complex, challenging, and relevant topic, this class will prepare you for the critical thinking and writing you will be expected to do as honors students.

 

Required Texts:

Gary Colombo, Robert Cullen and Bonnie Lisle, Rereading America, 9th edition

 

Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein, They Say, I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd edition

 

Richard Bullock and Francine Weinberg, The Little Seagull Handbook,2nd edition


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ENG 190(1): Composition I Transfers

instructor:  Elizabeth SotoMore
time:  MWF 8:30-9:20
description: 
For information on this course contact the instructor at lyz@hawaii.rr.com

ENG 190(2): Composition I Transfers

instructor:  TBA
time:  TR 9:00-10:15